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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONVERTING ALASKA FISH BY-PRODUCTS INTO VALUE ADDED INGREDIENTS AND PRODUCTS Title: Engineering and functional properties of protein powders from underutilized marine fish and by-products

Authors
item Sathivel, S - UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA
item BECHTEL, PETER

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: July 20, 2006
Publication Date: February 20, 2007
Citation: Sathivel, S., Bechtel, P.J. 2007. Engineering and functional properties of protein powders from underutilized marine fish and by-products. In Shahidi, F., editor. Maximising the Value of Marine By-Products. Cambridge, England. Woodhead Publishing Ltd. pp.250-257.

Interpretive Summary: Large amounts of protein-rich by-products from the seafood industry in Alaska are discarded or processed into fish meal. Novel processing methods are needed to convert seafood by-products into marketable products. Many of these protein-rich seafood by-products have a range of good functional properties and can potentially be used in foods as binders and emulsifiers. Proteins from fish processing by-products can be modified to improve their quality and functional characteristics using enzymatic hydrolysis and other methods.

Technical Abstract: Novel processing methods are needed to convert seafood by-products into marketable products. Protein derived from seafood by-products can have a range of good functional properties and can potentially be used as binders and emulsifiers. Functional properties of fish proteins are related to their physical, chemical, and conformational properties. Proteins from fish processing by-products can be modified to improve their quality and functional characteristics using enzymatic hydrolysis. Utilizing commercial proteolytic enzymes, fish protein hydrolysates can be prepared with peptides having new and/or improved properties. This chapter discusses engineering and functional properties of proteins and hydrolysates made from marine fish protein and fish processing by-products.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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