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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PEST BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE Title: Effectiveness of Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Areawide Pest Management in South Dakota

Authors
item French, Bryan
item Chandler, Laurence
item Riedell, Walter

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 5, 2007
Publication Date: October 1, 2007
Citation: French, B.W., Chandler, L.D., Riedell, W.E. 2007. Effectiveness of Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Areawide Pest Management in South Dakota. J. Econ. Entomol. 100(5): 1542-1554.

Interpretive Summary: Corn rootworms can cause serious economic damage to corn. The U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service implemented a five year (1997-2001) areawide pest management program in five geographic locations, including one in South Dakota. The overall objective was to employ integrated pest management tactics to suppress adult corn rootworm populations over a broad geographic area using aerially applied insecticides. If successful, suppressed populations should reduce oviposition, limit larval feeding damage to corn roots, and result in fewer beetles emerging in subsequent years. We used emergence cages, sticky traps, and CRW lure traps to monitor adult northern and western corn rootworm populations. We sampled for their eggs and determined damage to corn roots. For comparison, we sampled in several cornfields (control) located near the areawide site. The insecticides were effective in reducing adult populations one and two weeks following application, and most remained low for the duration of the corn growing season. Generally, over the five years fewer adult beetles were captured in both sticky and lure traps in the areawide site than in the control site. Egg counts and adult emergence were similar between the areawide and control sites and, with the exception of 1999; corn root damage was similar between the two sites, however, corn roots had greater fresh weight in the control site. Based on our findings, the areawide approach to managing corn rootworm beetles in corn is as effective as traditional management strategies.

Technical Abstract: Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence and D. v. virgifera virgifera LeConte are serious pests of maize (Zea mays L.). The U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service implemented a five year (1997-2001) areawide pest management program in five geographic locations, including one in South Dakota. The overall objective was to employ integrated pest management tactics to suppress adult Diabrotica populations over a broad geographic area using aerially applied semiochemical-baited insecticides. If successful, suppressed populations should reduce oviposition, limit larval feeding damage to maize roots, and result in fewer beetles emerging in subsequent years. We used emergence cages, sticky traps, and CRW lure traps to monitor adult D. barberi and D. v. virgifera populations. We sampled for Diabrotica eggs and determined damage to maize roots. For comparison, we sampled in several maize fields (control) located near the areawide site. The baited insecticides were effective in reducing adult populations one and two weeks following application, and most remained low for the duration of the maize growing season. Generally, over the five years fewer adult beetles were captured in both sticky and lure traps in the areawide site than in the control site. Egg counts and adult emergence were similar between the areawide and control sites and, with the exception of 1999; maize root damage was similar between the two sites, however, maize roots had greater fresh weight in the control site. Based on our findings, the areawide approach to managing Diabrotica beetles in maize is as effective as traditional management strategies.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014