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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: REARING AND RELEASE TECHNOLOGY FOR AUTOCIDAL AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF TEPHRITID FRUIT FLIES Title: Attraction of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) and Nontarget Insects to Methyl Eugenol Bucket Traps with Different Preservative Fluids on Oahu Island, Hawaiian Islands

Authors
item Uchida, Grant
item Mackey, Bruce
item McInnis, Donald
item Vargas, Roger

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 15, 2006
Publication Date: April 1, 2007
Citation: Uchida, G.K., Mackey, B.E., Mcinnis, D.O., Vargas, R.I. 2006. Attraction of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) and Nontarget Insects to Methyl Eugenol Bucket Traps with Different Preservative Fluids on Oahu Island, Hawaiian Islands. Journal of Economic Entomology. 100:717-722.

Interpretive Summary: The attraction of other no-fruit fly insects to traps designed to capture fruit flies only can be a major problem. The goal is to minimize the unwanted attraction of such non-target insects by utilizing specific chemical solutions such as preservative fluids ethylene glycol antifreeze, propylene glycol antifreeze, or mineral oil. By using such chemicals the fruit flies attracted to the baits in bucket traps, which contained captured decaying male oriental fruit flies, a male lure (methyl eugenol), and a toxicant (DDVP vapor insecticidal strip) were compared with dry control traps. Due to the fragile nature of endemic Hawaiian insect fauna, the propylene glycol antifreeze bucket trap that captured some non-target insects was best suited for use in environments (e.g. nonnative habitats) where endemic species are known to be absent and mineral oil traps are more suited for minimizing insect captures in environmentally sensitive habitats.

Technical Abstract: Attraction of B. dorsalis and nontarget insects to preservative fluids ethylene glycol antifreeze, propylene glycol antifreeze, or mineral oil in bucket traps, which contained captured decaying male oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), a male lure (methyl eugenol), and a toxicant (DDVP vapor insecticidal strip) were compared with dry control traps. Significantly (P < 0.05) greater numbers of B. dorsalis were captured in propylene glycol antifreeze traps than in other attractant trap types. Among attractant trap types with lowest negative impacts on nontarget insects, control traps captured significantly lower numbers of three species and one morphospecies of scavenger flies, one species of plant feeding fly, and one species each of sweet and lipid-feeding ants. Mineral oil traps captured significantly lower numbers of two species of scavengers flies and one morphospecies of plant feeding fly, and one species of sweet feeding ant. Due to the fragile nature of endemic Hawaiian insect fauna, the propylene glycol antifreeze bucket trap is best suited for use in environments (e.g. nonnative habitats) where endemic species are known to be absent and mineral oil traps are more suited for minimizing insect captures in environmentally sensitive habitats.

Last Modified: 12/28/2014
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