Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUBTROPICAL INSECT PESTS

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Diaprepes root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

Author
item Lapointe, Stephen

Submitted to: Encyclopedia of Entomology
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: February 12, 2007
Publication Date: October 2, 2008
Citation: Lapointe, S.L. 2008. Diaprepes root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Encyclopedia of Entomology. p. 1210-1214.

Interpretive Summary: The tropical root weevil Diaprepes abbeviatus was described by Carl Linnaeus as Curculio abbreviatus in the tenth edition of his Systema Naturae in 1758 from specimens collected in the West Indies. D. abbreviatus is found on Puerto Rico and Hispaniola and in the Lesser Antilles from Grenada and Barbados in the south to the Virgin Islands in the north, Hispaniola, and possibly Cuba. The species appears to be absent from Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica. D. abbreviatus was discovered in Orange County, Florida in 1964. Since then, this highly polyphagous weevil has established in 23 Florida counties. In 2000, D. abbreviatus was reported to be established in a citrus grove in the Rio Grande valley of Texas and in 2005. It was discovered infesting ornamental palms in an urban area of Orange County, CA and subsequently found in Los Angeles County and San Diego County. The host plants, natural enemies, life cycle, damage caused, and management of this highly polyphagous pest are presented.

Technical Abstract: The tropical root weevil Diaprepes abbreviatus was described by Carl Linnaeus as Curculio abbreviatus in the tenth edition of his Systema Naturae in 1758 from specimens collected in the West Indies. D. abbreviatus is found on Puerto Rico and Hispaniola and in the Lesser Antilles from Grenada and Barbados in the south to the Virgin Islands in the north, Hispaniola, and possibly Cuba. The species appears to be absent from Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica. D. abbreviatus was discovered in Orange County, Florida in 1964. Since then, this highly polyphagous weevil has established in 23 Florida counties. In 2000, D, abbreviatus was reported to be established in a citrus grove in the Rio Grande valley of Texas and in 2005. It was discovered infesting ornamental palms in an urban area of Orange County, CA and subsequently found in Los Angeles County and San Diego County. The host plants, natural enemies, life cycle, damage caused, and management of this highly polyphagous pest are presented.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page