Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENETIC EXCHANGE AND GENE FLOW RISKS FROM PLANTS IN AGRICULTURE

Location: Vegetable Crops Research Unit

Title: Microsatellite loci development for red elm (Ulmus rubra Muhl.) and cross-species amplification with Siberian elm (Ulmus pumila L.)

Authors
item Zalapa, Juan - UNIV OF WISC MADISON
item Brunet, Johanne
item Guries, Raymond - UNIV OF WISC MADISON

Submitted to: Molecular Ecology Resources
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2007
Publication Date: January 1, 2008
Citation: Zalapa, J.E., Brunet, J., Guries, R.P. 2008. Microsatellite loci development for red elm (Ulmus rubra Muhl.) and cross-species amplification with Siberian elm (Ulmus pumila L.). Molecular Ecology Resources. 8:109-112.

Interpretive Summary: We describe the development of microsatellite primers in the red elm species, Ulmus rubra and the testing of these same primers in another elm species, Ulmus pumila. Microsatellite primers are co-dominant genetic markers where the genotype of the heterozygote individuals is distinguishable from the genotypes of either of the homozygotes. The development of such primers is important to study the population genetic structure of elm populations and gene flow between populations of a given species. The presence of species-specific alleles will be used to study patterns of hybridization between the native red elm, and the non-native invasive siberian elm. These markers facilitate the genetic study of these two elm species.

Technical Abstract: Ulmus pumila is an elm species, non-native to the United States which hybridizes with Ulmus rubra. In order to study the genetic structure and hybridization patterns between these two elm species, we developed fifteen primer pairs for microsatellite loci in U. rubra and tested their cross-amplification in U. pumila. All fifteen primers amplified in both species, eleven of which possessed species-specific alleles. Six loci were polymorphic in U. pumila and eight in U. rubra, each with 2 to 6 alleles per locus. These markers will facilitate the study of genetic structure and gene flow between U. rubra and exotic, invasive U. pumila.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page