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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: AREAWIDE PEST MANAGEMENT OF FRUIT FLIES IN HAWAII Title: Does one trap size fit all?

Authors
item Jang, Eric
item Vargas, Roger

Submitted to: Proceedings of the International Tropical Fruit Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 2006
Publication Date: October 1, 2006
Citation: Jang, E.B., Vargas, R.I. 2006. Does one trap size fit all?. Proceedings of the International Tropical Fruit Conference.

Interpretive Summary: With the Area Wide Integrated Fruit Fly Pest Management Program in Hawaii (HAW-FLYPM), a number of issues have emerged regarding lure-trapping methods and their effectiveness alone or in combination with bait sprays and sanitation. The restriction of lures to monitoring and detection uses in the U.S.A. is also being reevaluated by the Environmental Protection Agency. While use of these lures for population suppression is currently restricted to government eradication efforts, registration is progressing for products that growers can use for mass annihilation of male fruit flies. At the same time, there are increasing restrictions on the use of organophosphate pesticides, which necessitates advancing alternative trapping methods. USDA-ARS experiments have determined that the traditional water+lure trap approved for monitoring fruit fly populations in Hawaii, continues to be one of the most efficient traps for catching flies compared to lure-toxicant traps and one-way entrance traps. Nevertheless, these latter two trapping methods mentioned have their appropriate uses. For back yards and residential areas, it is highly unlikely that the EPA will approve traps containing organophosphate-based toxicants. In these situations, the one-way trap+lure is the easiest for the grower to use. Although the water+lure trap will catch more flies, it is more labor intensive. For the commercial growers, new products are going through the EPA registration process nationally, and there will most likely be specific registrations for the State of Hawaii. Individually packaged toxicant strips have been tested by the USDA, and individually packaged lures are currently available in Hawaii. However, over-reliance on lures alone may not achieve the levels of control required. The combination of lures, GF120 Naturalyte bait spray, and sanitation have proven to be the most effective.

Technical Abstract: With the Area Wide Integrated Fruit Fly Pest Management Program in Hawaii (HAW-FLYPM), a number of issues have emerged regarding lure-trapping methods and their effectiveness alone or in combination with bait sprays and sanitation. The traditional lure toxicant system (95 or 99% liquid lure with 1 or 5% dibrom or malathion respectively, in use for many years in detection and eradication programs throughout the United States and elsewhere) is being evaluated against new trap designs and new products. The restriction of lures to monitoring and detection uses in the U.S.A. is also being reevaluated. While use of these lures for population suppression is currently restricted to government eradication efforts, registration is progressing for products that growers can use for mass annihilation of male fruit flies. At the same time, there are increasing restrictions on the use of organophosphate pesticides, which necessitates advancing alternative trapping methods. USDA-ARS experiments have determined that the traditional water+lure trap approved for monitoring fruit fly populations in Hawaii, continues to be one of the most efficient traps for catching flies compared to lure-toxicant traps and one-way entrance traps. Nevertheless, these latter two trapping methods mentioned have their appropriate uses. For back yards and residential areas, it is highly unlikely that the EPA will approve traps containing organophosphate-based toxicants. In these situations, the one-way trap+lure is the easiest for the grower to use. Although the water+lure trap will catch more flies, it is more labor intensive. For the commercial growers, new products are going through the EPA registration process nationally, and there will most likely be specific registrations for the State of Hawaii. Individually packaged toxicant strips have been tested by the USDA, and individually packaged lures are currently available in Hawaii. However, over-reliance on lures alone may not achieve the levels of control required. The combination of lures, GF120 Naturalyte bait spray, and sanitation have proven to be the most effective.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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