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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY BASED TECHNIQUES TO LIMIT THE DISPERSAL OF INVASIVE PESTS

Location: Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research Unit

Title: Bioclimatic model of the spined soldier bug (Heteroptera:Pentatomidae) using CLIMEX: testing model predictions at two spatial scales

Authors
item Legaspi, Jesusa
item Legaspi, Benjamin - STATE OF FLORIDA

Submitted to: Journal of Entomological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2007
Publication Date: October 1, 2007
Citation: Legaspi, J.C., Legaspi, B.C. 2007. Bioclimatic model of the spined soldier bug (Heteroptera:Pentatomidae) using CLIMEX: testing model predictions at two spatial scales. Journal of Entomological Science. 42:(4):533-547.

Interpretive Summary: Scientists with ARS, Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology and the State of Florida developed a model for a generalist insect predator, Podisus maculiventris, using the CLIMEX software. This provided us of a map of potential distribution of this predator based on documented records as well as the historical weather data. We also used insect counts from pheromone traps collected in Indiana and Florida for several years. The potential distribution map matched distribution records in North America. No matches were found in Europe, South America, mid-Africa, and Southeast Asia. Growth index curves did not match the pheromone trap data. We discuss possible reasons for our results and the limitaions of using climatic models.

Technical Abstract: A bioclimatic model of the polyphagous predator, Podisus maculiventris (Say) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) was developed using CLIMEX software. Calibration distribution was fitted using known distribution records for the United States and Canada, after which the model was used to generate a potential distribution map for the entire world. As expected, potential distribution maps agreed with known distribution records for North America. However, apparent mismatches were found for distribution in Europe, South America, mid-Africa, and Southeast Asia. Using historical weather data, CLIMEX "growth indices" (measure of climate suitability for insect development) were compared against multi-year pheromone trap counts in the northern (Indiana) and southern (Florida) United States. Growth index curves did not match pheromone trap data in either location. We discuss possible reasons for mismatches between CLIMEX predictions at the global and field scales, as well as the utility and limitations of the climatic modeling approach.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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