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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Electrical resistance sensors for soil water tension estimates

Authors
item Evett, Steven
item Hignett, Cliff - SOIL WATER SOLUTIONS
item Heng, Lee - IAEA

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: February 6, 2007
Publication Date: February 1, 2008
Citation: Evett, S.R., Hignett, C., Heng, L. 2008. Electrical resistance sensors for soil water tension estimates. In: Evett, S.R., Heng, L.K., Moutonnet, P., Nguyen, M.L., editors. Field Estimation of Soil Water Content: A Practical Guide to Methods, Instrumentation, and Sensor Technology. IAEA-TCS-30. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria. ISSN 1018-5518. p. 123-129.

Interpretive Summary: As a chapter in a book to be published by the International Atomic Energy Agency/FAO Joint Division, this publication will reach a world wide audience of agriculturalists, including scientists and practitioners. It contains detailed information on how to sense soil water tension (suction) using electrical resistance sensors, including the venerable gypsum block. The chapter provides insight into problems commonly encountered in using resistance sensors, which are among the least expensive soil water sensors. Instruction on data recording is also given. The theory and practice of electrical resistance sensors is presented, with explanation of the differences and strengths of the two major types of these sensors. A procedural guide for installation in the field is given, as is guidance for choosing third-party equipment that improves the utility of the method.

Technical Abstract: This chapter, in a book to be published by the International Atomic Energy Agency/FAO Joint Division, provides detailed information on how to sense soil water tension with electrical resistance sensors. It provides insight into problems commonly encountered in using these sensors. Guidance on data recording and analysis is also given. The theory and practice of electrical resistance sensors is presented, with explanation of the differences and strengths of the two major types of these sensors, the gypsum block and the granular matrix sensor. A procedural guide is given for calibrating, installing and using the equipment; as is guidance for choosing third-party equipment that improves the utility of the method.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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