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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Female offspring of rat dams fed low boron diets during pregnancy and lactation exhibit signs of the metabolic syndrome during early adulthood: increased body weight, and serum triglycerides and total cholesterol concentratio

Authors
item Hunt, Curtiss
item IDSO, JOSEPH

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 7, 2006
Publication Date: April 1, 2007
Repository URL: http://www.fasebj.org
Citation: Hunt, C., Idso, J.P. 2007. Female offspring of rat dams fed low boron diets during pregnancy and lactation exhibit signs of the metabolic syndrome during early adulthood: increased body weight, and serum triglycerides and total cholesterol concentrations [abstract]. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 21(5):A125.

Technical Abstract: To expand on reports from this laboratory that low dietary boron may affect energy substrate utilization, we determined whether low dietary boron during early development promotes manifestation of the metabolic syndrome in adult offspring. Sprague-Dawley dams were fed either a boron-low (BL;~0.1 mg B/kg) or boron-supplemented (BS;~3.0 mg B/kg) diet from 75 d prior to breeding (with diet-matched males) to weaning of pups. Female weanlings (21 d of age; 24/group) were re-randomized and fed either the BL or BS diet for 63 d. Beginning at 28 d post weaning, maternal boron deprivation, but not post-weaning boron nutriture, increased body weight (p=0.0001) in offspring (215 vs 192 g at 84 d of age). Also, at 84 d of age, maternal boron deprivation increased serum concentrations of triglycerides (0.54 vs 0.47 mmol/L, p=0.005) and total cholesterol (2.04 vs 1.89 mmol/L, p=0.004) and decreased alkaline phosphatase (136 vs 124 U/L; p=0.004). Independent of maternal nutriture, post-weaning boron deprivation increased serum concentrations of glucose (11.2 vs 10.1 mmol/L;p=0.001). The findings that a maternal diet limited in boron content (i.e., one low in fruit, nut, vegetable,and legume content) may increase manifestation of some components of the metabolic syndrome in adult offspring, including an 11% increase in body weight, suggests a possible role for boron in prevention of the syndrome.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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