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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evaluation of different hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) chimeras using a newly developed reverse genetic system based on the mesogenic anhinga Newcastle disease virus strain

Authors
item Estevez, Carlos
item Yu, Qingzhong
item King, Daniel
item Miller, Patti

Submitted to: American Veterinary Medical Association Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 2, 2007
Publication Date: July 14, 2007
Citation: Estevez, C., Yu, Q., King, D.J., Miller, P.J. 2007. Evaluation of different hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) chimeras using a newly developed reverse genetic system based on the mesogenic anhinga Newcastle disease virus strain [abstract]. 144th American Veterinary Medical Association Annual Convention Notes, July 14-28, 2007, Washington, DC. CD, paper #4439.

Technical Abstract: A major factor in the pathogenicity of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is the amino acid sequence of the fusion protein cleavage site, but the role of other viral genes that contribute to different clinical forms of the disease remain undefined. To assess the role of other NDV genes in virus pathogenicity, a reverse genetics system was established with the NDV anhinga strain, a virus of moderate virulence, to provide a backbone for generating gene mutations or gene exchanges in attempts to enhance or attenuate virulence of that virus. Chimeras of that backbone created by exchange of the anhinga hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene with HN genes of neurotropic and viscerotropic velogens produced no significant change in virus pathogenicity as assessed by conducting the mean death time and intracerebral pathogenicity index assays and by inoculation of susceptible day-old SPF birds. A HN gene exchange alone within the context of the NDV anhinga backbone failed to increase virus virulence and suggests a multigenic role for NDV pathogenicity.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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