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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF MOTHS, LEAFHOPPERS, AND TRUE BUGS OF IMPORTANCE TO AGRICULTURAL, FOREST, AND ORNAMENTAL PLANTS Title: A review of potentially invasive species of Lymantria Hüebner [1819] (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae:Lymantriinae) from subtropical and temperate regions of Asia including the descriptions of three new species

Authors
item Pogue, Michael
item Schaefer, Paul - RETIRED ARS/USDA

Submitted to: Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team
Publication Type: Government Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: December 18, 2006
Publication Date: May 31, 2007
Citation: Pogue, M.G., Schaefer, P.W. 2007. A review of potentially invasive species of Lymantria Hüebner [1819] (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae:Lymantriinae) from subtropical and temperate regions of Asia including the descriptions of three new species. Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team. FHTE:1-223.

Interpretive Summary: Each year approximately $11 million is spent on gypsy moth control. Gypsy moths are some of the most destructive forest pests in the world. Potential invasive species of gypsy moths from temperate and sub-tropical Asia are a threat to the forests of North America. Three species new to science are described from China, Japan, and Taiwan. A total of 31 species are diagnosed and illustrated to facilitate identification of these potentially invasive species. The concept and name of the Asian gypsy moth has changed based on molecular analysis. The results will be useful for scientists, entomologists, Forest Service personnel, and quarantine inspectors and identifiers will use this information.

Technical Abstract: The genus Lymantria Hüebner [1819] contains some of the most destructive forest pests in the world. Potential invasive species of Lymantria from temperate and sub-tropical Asia are a threat to the forests of North America. Treated here are 31 species and two subspecies of Lymantria that if accidentally introduced into North America could result in severe economic loss to native forests. Three species are described as new Lymantria (Porthetria) brunneoloma, n. sp. from China, Lymantria (Lymantria) pulverea, n. sp. from Taiwan, and Lymantria (Nyctria) flavida, n. sp. from Okinawa, Japan. Lymantria (Porthetria) dispar asiatica Vnukovskij, revised synonymy is a synonym of Lymantria (Porthetria) dispar japonica (Motschulsky). Lymantria (Porthetria) umbrosa (Butler), revised status is considered a valid species and a lectotype was designated to establish nomenclatural stability. Lymantria (Porthetria) albescens Hori and Umeno, Lymantria (Porthetria) postalba Inoue, revised status are considered valid species. Lymantria (Porthetria) xylina nobunaga Nagano, revised synonymy is considered a synonym of L. (Porthetria) xylina Swinhoe. The following are treated as new synonymies of Lymantria (Porthetria) lunata (Stöll): Lymantria (Porthetria) lunata ingrami Schintlmeister and Lymantria (Porthetria) lunata carteri Schintlmeister; and revised synonymy Lymantria lunata (Porthetria) curvifera Walker. Lymantria minomonis okinawaensis Kishida, revised synonymy of Lymantria (Lymantria) minomonis Matsumura. The following are treated as new synonymies of Lymantria (Porthetria) similis Moore: Lymantria (Lymantria) similis f. niasica Strand, Lymantria (Lymantria) similis loeffleri Schintlmeister, and Lymantria (Lymantria) similis monachoides Schintlmeister. Lymantria (Lymantria) concolor septentrionalis Schintlmeister, new synonymy of Lymantria (Lymantria) concolor Walker. Lymantria mathura auora Butler, revised synonymy of Lymantria (Nyctria) mathura Moore. The following are considered new synonymies of Lymantria (Collentria) grisea Moore: Lymantria grisea grisea Moore, Lymantria kosemponis Strand, Lymantria grisea kosemponis Strand, Lymantria servula Collenette, Lymantria grisea servula Collenette. Lymantria (Spinotria) bantaizana Matsumura, revised status is considered a valid species. Descriptions, distributions, and illustrations of adults are included. Larvae of thirteen species and two subspecies are described and illustrated. Sections provide information on oviposition, biology and behavior, food plants, pheromonal communication, flight and pheromone periodicity, and seasonality when known.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014
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