Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: High Levels of Field Resistance to Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus in Peanut Breeding Lines Derived from hypogaea and hirsuta Botanical Varieties

Authors
item Culbreath, A - UNIV OF GEORGIA
item Gorbet, D - UNIV OF FLORIDA
item Martinez-Ochoa, N - UNIV OF GEORGIA
item Holbrook, C
item Todd, J - UNIV OF GEORGIA
item Isleib, T - NORTH CAROLINA STATE
item Tillman, B - UNIV OF FLORIDA

Submitted to: Peanut Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 30, 2006
Publication Date: December 10, 2006
Citation: Culbreath, A.K., Gorbet, D.W., Martinez-Ochoa, N., Holbrook Jr, C.C., Todd, J.W., Isleib, T.G., Tillman, B. 2005. High Levels of Field Resistance to Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus in Peanut Breeding Lines Derived from hypogaea and hirsuta Botanical Varieties. Peanut Sci. 32:20-24.

Interpretive Summary: Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is a major problem in peanut producing areas of the southeastern U.S. The development of varieties with higher levels of resistance would greatly benefit peanut farmers in this region. The objective of this study was to compare three peanut breeding lines that have shown promise for improved field resistance to TSWV to the standard moderately resistant cultivar Georgia Green for field response to TSWV. Field tests were conducted for two years at one location in Georgia, and one location in Florida. In all four tests, final spotted wilt intensity ratings for all three breeding lines were much lower and pod yields were higher than for Georgia Green. At least one of these breeding lines will be released as a variety.

Technical Abstract: Tomato spotted wilt, caused by Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) is a major problem in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) producing areas of the southeastern U.S. The integrated program used to manage spotted wilt relies heavily on cultivars with field resistance to TSWV, and developing cultivars with greater levels of resistance TSWV is high priority of peanut breeding programs in the region. Finding new sources of resistance is also highly desirable. The objective of this study was to compare three peanut breeding lines, F NC94022-1-2-1-1-b3-B, C 11-2-39, and C 11-186 that have shown promise for improved field resistance to TSWV, to the standard moderately resistant cultivar Georgia Green for field response to TSWV. F NC94022-1-2-1-1-b3-B was of particular interest because it was developed from a cross between lines of A. hypogaea subsp. hypogaea var. hirsuta Kohler and A. hypogaea subsp. hypogaea var. hypogaea. Field tests were conducted in 2003 and 2004 in Marianna, Florida and Tifton, Georgia. In all four tests, final spotted wilt intensity ratings for breeding lines F NC94022-1-2-1-1-b3-B, C 11-2-39, and C 11-186 were much lower and pod yields were higher than for Georgia Green. In three of the four tests, final spotted wilt intensity ratings did not differ among F NC94022-1-2-1-1-b3-B, C 11-2-39, and C 11-186. At the Marianna site in 2004, spotted wilt intensity ratings were lower and pod yields were higher in F NC94022-1-2-1-1-b3-B than in any other entry. The high level of field resistance to TSWV in F NC94022-1-2-1-1-b3-B is presumably derived from its hirsuta type parent, PI 576638.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page