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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECOLOGICAL, PHYSIOLOGICAL AND GENETIC ASPECTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS IN FIELD CROP SYSTEMS Title: Uncertainties in the current knowledge of some atmospheric trace gases associated with US agriculture

Authors
item Krupa, Sagar - UNIV OF MINNESOTA
item Booker, Fitzgerald
item Bowersox, Van - ILLINOIS STATE WATER SURV
item Lehmann, C -
item Grantz, D -

Submitted to: Journal of Air and Waste Management Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 19, 2008
Publication Date: August 1, 2008
Citation: Krupa, S., Booker, F.L., Bowersox, V., Grantz, D., Lehmann, C. 2008. Uncertainties in the current knowledge of some atmospheric trace gases associated with US agriculture. Journal of Air and Waste Management Association. Vol 58, pp. 986-993.

Interpretive Summary: Approximately 80 different crop species are grown in the US in widely differing geographic areas, climatic and edaphic conditions and management practices. Although the majority of cultivated acreage in the US is planted with only about ten primary crops, uncertainties associated with trace gas emissions arise from: (1) limited data availability and consequently inaccurate estimates due to the large temporal and spatial variability in trace gas composition and amounts released from agricultural activities, (2) differing characteristics of pollutant emissions from highly dispersed animal feed-lots, and (3) our limited understanding of the emissions of semi-volatile and volatile organic compounds associated with agriculture. While emission issues are of concern, so is atmospheric wet and dry deposition of N, mineral nutrients and organic compounds to cropping systems that can, in turn, have feedback effects on trace gas emissions. Overall, the many gaps in our understanding of these processes deserve serious attention.

Technical Abstract: Approximately 80 different crop species are grown in the US in widely differing geographic areas, climatic and edaphic conditions and management practices. Although the majority of cultivated acreage in the US is planted with only about ten primary crops, uncertainties associated with trace gas emissions arise from: (1) limited data availability and consequently inaccurate estimates due to the large temporal and spatial variability in trace gas composition and amounts released from agricultural activities, (2) differing characteristics of pollutant emissions from highly dispersed animal feed-lots, and (3) our limited understanding of the emissions of semi-volatile and volatile organic compounds associated with agriculture. While emission issues are of concern, so is atmospheric wet and dry deposition of N, mineral nutrients and organic compounds to cropping systems that can, in turn, have feedback effects on trace gas emissions. Overall, the many gaps in our understanding of these processes deserve serious attention.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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