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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Hemicellulases for Mediating Biomass Saccharification

Authors
item Jordan, Douglas
item Dien, Bruce
item Li, Xin Liang
item Cotta, Michael

Submitted to: Renewable Energy
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: October 13, 2006
Publication Date: October 13, 2006
Citation: Jordan, D.B., Dien, B.S., Li, X., Cotta, M.A. 2006. Hemicellulases for mediating biomass saccharification. In: Proceedings of Renewable Energy 2006, October 9-13, 2006, Makuhari Messe, Chiba, Japan. p. 1036-1041.

Interpretive Summary: Agricultural biomass like crop residues, grain processing byproducts, dedicated energy crops (e.g., switchgrass), etc., represents an abundant, renewable feedstock for production of ethanol and other valuable products if practical conversion technologies can be developed. These materials are rich in complex carbohydrates that must first be broken down to simple sugars that can be fermented by microorganisms to ethanol and other products. A critical step in the development of new conversion processes is the discovery and development of new enzymes to convert these complex materials to simple sugars. In this work, we review studies conducted at the National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research (NCAUR) that establish (1) enzymatic saccharification of corn fiber by enzymes from fungal cultures that can provide high yields of monosaccharides which can be fermented to ethanol efficiently and (2) the feasibility of discovering highly efficient glycoside hydrolases to accomplish enzymatic saccharification of biomass with minimal consumption of resources as demonstrated by the discovery of a catalytically efficient beta-D-xylosidase.

Technical Abstract: Enzymatic hydrolysis of hemicellulose offers the potential of producing high yields of monosaccharides for fermentation to fuel ethanol and other bioproducts, minimizing monosaccharide degradation and associated byproducts that can be toxic to fermenting organisms. In this work, we review studies that establish (1) enzymatic saccharification of corn fiber by enzymes from fungal cultures that can provide high yields of monosaccharides which can be fermented to ethanol efficiently and (2) the feasibility of discovering highly efficient glycoside hydrolases to accomplish enzymatic saccharification of biomass with minimal consumption of resources as demonstrated by the discovery of a catalytically efficient beta-D-xylosidase.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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