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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Barley stripe mosaic and Barley yellow stripe

Author
item Edwards, Michael

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 31, 2006
Publication Date: April 1, 2010
Citation: Edwards, M.C. 2010. Barley Stripe Mosaic and Barley Yellow Stripe. Pp. 99-100 In: Compendium of Wheat Diseases and Pests, 3rd Edition, edited by W.W. Bockus, R.L. Bowden, R.M. Hunger, W.L. Morrill, T.D. Murray, and R.W. Smiley, APS Press, St. Paul.

Interpretive Summary: Barley stripe mosaic was described in Wisconsin as "barley false stripe" in 1910, making it perhaps the first cereal virus disease described in the United States. The disease has been reported from most barley-producing areas of the world, including North and South America, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Australia. The causal agent, Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV), was characterized in 1951 and may be the only virus infecting the grass family that is efficiently transmitted through seed. In nature, BSMV occurs primarily in barley and only rarely in wheat, except perhaps in China and Israel. It has also been found in wild oats within barley fields, but several other grass species and some dicotyledonous plants can be infected as experimental hosts. Seed transmission in wheat occurs via both male and female plant parts, but is limited by severe symptoms and poor seed set on diseased plants. In hosts other than barley, seed transmission is relatively inefficient. Barley yellow stripe is a distinct disease occurring in Turkey on wheat, oats, barley, and bromegrass. The causal agent has not been identified, but is transmitted by the leafhopper Euscelis plebejus (Fallen), which, by itself, causes enations on host plants. Barley yellow stripe is not sap-transmissible. Symptoms of barley yellow stripe on wheat include fine continuous stripes on leaves, sometimes followed by yellowing and death. It occurs especially along field borders and near grassy reservoirs of E. plebejus. Further information is provided on barley stripe mosaic.

Technical Abstract: Barley stripe mosaic was described in Wisconsin as "barley false stripe" in 1910, making it perhaps the first cereal virus disease described in the United States. The disease has been reported from most barley-producing areas of the world, including North and South America, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Australia. The causal agent, Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV), was characterized in 1951 and may be the only virus in the Gramineae efficiently transmitted through seed. In nature, BSMV occurs primarily in barley and only rarely in wheat, except perhaps in China and Israel. It has also been found in wild oats within barley fields, but several other grass species and some dicotyledonous plants can be infected as experimental hosts. Seed transmission in wheat occurs via both ovule and pollen, but is limited by severe symptoms and poor seed set on diseased plants. In hosts other than barley, seed transmission is relatively inefficient. Barley yellow stripe is a distinct disease occurring in Turkey on wheat, oats, barley, and bromegrass. The causal agent has not been identified, but is transmitted by the leafhopper Euscelis plebejus (Fallen), which, by itself, causes enations on host plants. Barley yellow stripe is not sap-transmissible. Symptoms of barley yellow stripe on wheat include fine continuous stripes on leaves, sometimes followed by yellowing and death. It occurs especially along field borders and near grassy reservoirs of E. plebejus. Further information is provided on barley stripe mosaic.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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