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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Registration of 'Georganic' Peanut

Authors
item Holbrook, C
item Culbreath, A - UNIV OF GA

Submitted to: Journal of Plant Registrations
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2007
Publication Date: January 15, 2008
Citation: Holbrook Jr, C.C., Culbreath, A.K. 2008. Registration of 'Georganic' Peanut. Journal of Plant Registrations. 2:17.

Interpretive Summary: ‘Georganic’ is a new peanut variety that is being jointly release by the USDA Agricultural Research Service, and the College of Agriculture & Environmental Sciences of the University of Georgia. Georganic has good yield with multiple disease resistances. Because it has a red testa, it is not acceptable for conventional peanut production. However, it has been adopted and is being grown by several organic peanut producers. Georganic is runner market-type in seed and pod size. It has a spreading runner growth habit with an erect mainstem that is prominent throughout the growing season, and at harvest. It has a high level of resistance to tomato spotted wilt virus(TSWV), early and late leaf spot. Georganic is a late maturity class peanut, with about 150 days needed for optimal maturity. Based on seed count per pound, it is intermediate between the relatively large seeded cultivar, C-99R, and the relatively small cultivar, Georgia Green. Georganic has percent meat comparable to other runner cultivars.

Technical Abstract: ‘Georganic' (Reg. No. , PI ) is a runner-type peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. hypogaea var. hypogaea) cultivar that was released by the USDA-ARS and the Georgia Agricultural Experiment Stations in 2006. It was developed at the University of Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, GA, and was tested under the experimental designation C11-2-39. Georganic originated from a cross of PI 203396 and the cultivar, AgraTech GK 7. The original population was advanced to the F4 using single seed descent. Individual F4 plants were harvested and the population was subjected to selection pressure for resistance to late leaf spot and tomato spotted wilt (caused by Tomato spotted wilt virus, TSWV) for the next three generations. During this same period , the population was also subjected to selection for desirable pod shape, seed size, growth habit, maturity, high yield, and grade characteristics. Georganic is a runner market-type in seed and pod size. It has a spreading runner growth habit with an erect mainstem that is prominent throughout the growing season, and at harvest. It has a high level of resistance to tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), early (Cercosporidium arachidicola Hori), and late (Cercosporidium personatum Berk. & M. A. Curtis) leaf spot. It is a late maturity class peanut, with about 150 days needed for optimal maturity. In a study using mechanical inoculation, Georganic exhibited significantly lower percentage of symptomatic plants in comparison to C-99R and Georgia Green. This study demonstrated that a mechanism of resistance in Georganic is restricted viral movement resulting in reduced systemic infection. Georganic has good yield with multiple disease resistances. Because it has a red testa, it is not acceptable for conventional peanut production. However, it has been adopted and is being grown by several organic peanut producers. Based on seed count per pound, Georganic is intermediate between the relatively large seeded cultivar, C-99R, and the relatively small seeded cultivar, Georgia Green . Georganic has a red testa (seed coat) with percent meat comparable to other runner cultivars. Seed of Georganic has been deposited in the National Plant Germplasm System, where it will be available for research purposes, including development and commercialization of new cultivars. Appropriate recognition is requested if this release contributes to the development of a new breeding line or cultivar. Breeder seed of Georganic will be maintained by the USDA-ARS at the Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, GA.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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