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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IDENTIFYING AND MANIPULATING DETERMINANTS OF PHOTOSYNTHATE PRODUCTION AND PARTITIONING

Location: Global Change and Photosynthesis Research Unit

Title: The effect of elevated CO2 on carbon and nitrogen metabolism in soybean under FACE

Authors
item Rogers, Alistair - BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LAB
item Gibon, Yves - MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE
item Ainsworth, Elizabeth
item Morgan, Patrick
item Bernacchi, Carl - IL STATE WATER SURVEY
item Stitt, Mark - MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE
item Ort, Donald
item Long, Stephen - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

Submitted to: ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: August 15, 2006
Publication Date: November 12, 2006
Citation: Rogers, A., Gibon, Y., Ainsworth, E.A., Morgan, P.B., Bernacchi, C.J., Stitt, M., Ort, D.R., Long, S.P. 2006. The effect of elevated CO2 on carbon and nitrogen metabolism in soybean under FACE [abstract]. ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts. Available: http://crops/cpmfex.com/crops/2006am/techprogram/P22990.htm .

Technical Abstract: Crops have the potential to exploit the predicted increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]). Growth is typically stimulated at elevated [CO2], but a sustained and maximal exploitation of rising [CO2] is dependent on an adequate supply of nutrients, principally nitrogen, and sufficient sink capacity to utilize the additional carbon fixed at elevated [CO2]. We have examined the effect of elevated [CO2] on carbon and nitrogen metabolism in soybean grown in the field using Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) technology where soybean is able to complete it's entire life cycle at an elevated concentration of CO2 under fully open air conditions. In both fully expanded and developing leaves we have shown that increased carbon availability at elevated [CO2] improved nitrogen assimilation. The additional carbon available at elevated [CO2] allowed soybeans to overcome an early season nitrogen limitation and suggests that soybeans were able to acclimate to the increased nitrogen demand at elevated [CO2].

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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