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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INVASION BIOLOGY OF INVASIVE SPECIES: BIOCONTROL AND RELATED TECHNOLOGIES FOR EXOTIC INSECT PESTS, WITH EMPHASIS ON ASIAN LONGHORNED BEETLE Title: Detecting Signs and Symptoms of Asian Longhorned Beetle Injury: A Training Guide

Authors
item Ric, Jozef - TORONTO PARKS FORESTRY &
item Groot, Peter DE - NATURAL RESOURCES CANADA
item Gasman, Ben - CANADIAN FOOD INSPECTION
item Orr, Mary - CANADIAN FOOD INSPECTION
item Doyle, Jason - TORONTO PARKS FORESTRY
item Smith, Michael
item Dumouchel, Louise - CANADIAN FOOD INSPECTION
item Scarr, Taylor - ONTARIO MINISTRY OF NATUR
item Turgeon, Jean - CANADIAN FOREST SERVICE

Submitted to: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: January 20, 2007
Publication Date: April 20, 2007
Repository URL: http://ISBN 0-662-4342 6-9
Citation: Ric, J., Groot, P., Gasman, B., Orr, M., Doyle, J., Smith, M.T., Dumouchel, L., Scarr, T., Turgeon, J.J. 2007. Detecting Signs and Symptoms of Asian Longhorned Beetle Injury: A Training Guide. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. 131pp.

Interpretive Summary: The Asian Longhorned beetle (ALB) is native to China and Korea. Between 1996 and 2004 ALB infestations were found in New York, Illinois, Austria, New Jersey, France, and Ontario, Canada. More recently, adult ALB were discovered in Sacramento, CA, putting at risk many tree species in western U.S. To date, over 40,000 high value shade trees have been cut and removed in North America in an effort to eradicate ALB. Preventing its permanent establishment requires that inspectors be trained to recognize ALB and its signs and symptoms of injury, as well as to conduct surveys to determine the outer boundaries of an infested area. Therefore, the studies reported here resulted in the development of the first comprehensive training guide for detection of ALB. This guide includes descriptions and color images of the life stages and the signs and symptoms of ALB injuries under field conditions. The final section comprises step-by-step instructions detailing: (1) how to examine individual trees, (2) where to look for the beetle and its signs of injury in the landscape and in trees, (3) when to conduct surveys and (4) what to do if beetles or signs of infestation are discovered. This information can be used to identify the most appropriate course of action (i.e., eradicate the invading species, minimize its impact or control or limit its spread) and is critical to the successful prevention of permanent establishment.

Technical Abstract: The Asian Longhorned beetle (ALB), Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is native to China and Korea. Between 1996 and 2004 ALB infestations were found in New York, Illinois, Austria, New Jersey, France, and Ontario, Canada. More recently, adult ALB were discovered in Sacramento, CA, putting at risk many tree species in western U.S. In North America, this invasive alien insect attacks and kills a wide range of deciduous tree species, and thus poses a high-risk to the urban and natural forests of U.S. and Canada. To date, over 40,000 high value shade trees have been cut and removed in North America in an effort to eradicate ALB. Once an alien species is discovered, a delimiting survey is required to quickly establish the boundaries of the infested area. Survey results are then used to identify the most appropriate course of action (i.e., eradicate the invading species, minimize its impact or control or limit its spread). Rapid response requires that inspectors already skilled in plant pest identification, be trained to recognize and detect the new invading species as well as its signs and symptoms of injury. Therefore, the studies reported here resulted in the development of the first comprehensive training guide for detection of ALB. This guide includes descriptions and color images of the life stages and the signs and symptoms of ALB injuries under field conditions. A list of tree genera found in the urban forest is also included. The final section comprises step-by-step instructions detailing: (1) how to examine individual trees, (2) where to look for the beetle and its signs of injury in the landscape and in trees, (3) when to conduct surveys and (4) what to do if beetles or signs of infestation are discovered. A brief description of the verification process is also included.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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