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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Potential for bluetongue virus persistence in insect cells.

Authors
item Wilson, William
item Drolet, Barbara
item Bennett, Kristine
item O Hearn, Emily
item Brown, Philip
item Stuart, Melissa
item Mecham, James

Submitted to: American Society for Virology Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 11, 2006
Publication Date: July 14, 2006
Citation: Wilson, W.C., Drolet, B.S., Bennett, K.E., O Hearn, E.S., Brown, P.L., Stuart, M.A., Mecham, J.O. 2006. Potential for bluetongue virus persistence in insect cells.. American Society for Virology Meeting. 25th Annual Meeting, W22-9.

Interpretive Summary: A potential persistent bluetongue virus (BTV) infection of an insect cell line is under investigation. Culicoides sonorensis, a biting midge, is the primary vector in the U.S. for BTV, which infects sheep, cattle, and wild ruminants. A Culicoides cell line (KC cell line) developed at the ABADRL has been shown to carry viral components in the insect cells, but has not been shown to produce virus infectious to mammalian cells. The hypothesis is that the KC cell line contains a low titer insect specific core virus that has been termed a host specific persistent virus. BTV genetic and protein components have been identified in this cell-line. The relevance of this host specific persistent infection phenomenon to viral overwintering in Culicoides is discussed

Technical Abstract: A potential persistent bluetongue virus (BTV) infection of an insect cell line is under investigation. Culicoides sonorensis, a biting midge, is the primary vector in the U.S. for BTV, which infects sheep, cattle, and wild ruminants. A Culicoides cell line (KC cell line) developed at the ABADRL has been shown to carry viral components in the insect cells, but has not been shown to produce virus infectious to mammalian cells. The hypothesis is that the KC cell line contains a low titer insect specific core virus that has been termed a host specific persistent virus. This persistent infection of the Culicoides cell line has been verified by the detection of a core protein (VP7) and a non-structural protein involved in cell exit (NS3) by immunocytochemistry. In addition, the gene segments for another core protein (VP3) and the NS3 protein were detected by RT-PCR and sequence confirmation. The gene segments detected have sequence homology to the domestic serotype BTV 17. The relevance of this host specific persistent infection phenomenon to viral overwintering in Culicoides is discussed.

Last Modified: 8/31/2014