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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Likelihood of mated females of Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera: Tephritidae) entering an area from infested grapefruits discarded onto backyard compost piles

Authors
item Hennessey, Michael - USDA-APHIS-PPQ
item Kendra, Paul
item Jones, Edward - USDA-APHIS-PPQ
item Montgomery, Wayne
item Epsky, Nancy

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: June 17, 2006
Publication Date: September 12, 2006
Citation: Hennessey, M.K., Kendra, P.E., Jones, E.M., Montgomery, W.S., Epsky, N.D. 2006. Likelihood of mated females of Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera: Tephritidae) entering an area from infested grapefruits discarded onto backyard compost piles. Meeting Abstract.

Technical Abstract: Backyard composting of infested fruit is a pathway for entry of exotic fruit flies. Experimentally infested grapefruits were discarded onto forty compost pile replicates. Males and possibly-mated females emerged from 43% (17) of the piles. From this experiment, based on the number of fruit discarded, the infestation rate, and the stage of the larvae when discarded, only two infested grapefruit were required to produce a possibly mated female. Natural enemies and temperature were mortality factors causing 92% mortality after discarding onto piles. As the compost temperature increased to 49 degrees C (120 degrees F), the number of flies emerging tended toward zero. However, compost temperature was variable and usually not that hot. In conclusion, there is a high likelihood that a mated female fruit fly that can found an outbreak can originate from infested fruit discarded onto a backyard compost pile

Last Modified: 11/23/2014