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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: White Fleshed Peaches and Nectarines for the Southeastern U.S.A.

Authors
item Layne, D - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
item Okie, William

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 26, 2006
Publication Date: July 1, 2006
Citation: Layne, D.M., Okie, W.R. 2006. White fleshed peaches and nectarines for the Southeastern U.S.A [abstract]. HortScience. 41(4):1029.

Interpretive Summary: Most consumers are more familiar with yellow-fleshed peaches than white-fleshed. In fact, white-fleshed peaches and nectarines are delicacies that have been enjoyed for centuries around the world. They are native to China and were introduced to the United States in the 1800s. Until the twentieth century, they were the main type peach grown in the US. Many white-fleshed peaches and nectarines are highly perishable and bruise easily, but are of very high eating quality. These are perhaps best suited for the local roadside market, where they can be sold and consumed more quickly. Others are much firmer at harvest, have a longer shelf life. and are suitable for long-distance transport to wholesale markets. In our peach and nectarine cultivar evaluation program at Clemson University, we are currently evaluating 70 cultivars and advanced selections at four different locations in South Carolina. Several of these have been evaluated since 2000 and the top performers over the last six seasons by ripening date (earliest to latest) include the following: 'Sugar May', 'Scarletpearl', 'Snowbrite', 'Southernpearl', 'White Lady', 'Sugar Lady', 'Summer Sweet', 'Sugar Giant', 'Stark's Summer Pearl', 'Snow King', and 'Snow Giant'. In general, most of the white nectarines and the flat/donut peaches and nectarines have serious problems with insect damage and brown rot.

Technical Abstract: White-fleshed peaches and nectarines are delicacies that have been enjoyed for centuries around the world. They are native to China and were introduced to the United States in the 1800s. Some white-fleshed peaches and nectarines are highly perishable and bruise easily, but are of very high eating quality. These are perhaps best suited for the local roadside market, where they can be sold and consumed more quickly. Others are much firmer at harvest, have a longer shelf life. and are suitable for long-distance transport to wholesale markets. White-fleshed peaches and nectarines may have some acidity or they may be very low acid with high sugar content ('Brix). Some novel flat (peento or donut) types also exist. Proximity to an urban market with a substantial Asian population is advantageous because Asians, in particular, often prefer the low-acid flavor and are willing to pay premium prices for high quality fruits. In our peach and nectarine cultivar evaluation program at Clemson University, we are currently evaluating 70 cultivars and advanced selections at four different locations in South Carolina. Several of these have been evaluated since 2000 and the top performers over the last six seasons by ripening date (earliest to latest) include the following: 'Sugar May', 'Scarletpearl', 'Snowbrite', 'Southernpearl', 'White Lady', 'Sugar Lady', 'Summer Sweet', 'Sugar Giant', 'Stark's Summer Pearl', 'Snow King', and 'Snow Giant'. In general, most of the white nectarines and the flat/donut peaches and nectarines have serious problems with insect damage and brown rot. Complete details of our peach and nectarine (yellow- and white-flesh) evaluation work in South Carolina since 2000 will be noted by referring to my peach website ( http://www.clemson.edu/hort/Peach/index.php ).

Last Modified: 10/30/2014