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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Ubiquitin Becomes Ubiquitous in GA Signaling

Authors
item Ariizumi, Tohru - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Steber, Camille

Submitted to: Plant Physiology
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: July 10, 2006
Publication Date: September 30, 2006
Citation: Ariizumi, T., Steber, C.M. 2006. Ubiquitin becomes ubiquitous in GA signaling, In: Taiz, L. and Zeiger, E., editors. Plant Physiology 4th Edition, Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Associates. 20:20.3.

Interpretive Summary: Research in a wide range of plant species show where the hormone gibberellin (GA) stimulates critical stages in plant growth such as seed germination, stem elongation, transition to flowering, and flower development in most plant species by triggering the destruction of negative regulatory DELLA proteins. Genes of the DELLA family act as repressors of these GA responses. It appears that GA stimulates GA responses by causing DELLA protein destruction via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in diverse species including rice, barley, and Arabidopsis. This essay will use Arabidopsis as an example.

Technical Abstract: Research in a wide range of plant species has converged on a story where the hormone gibberellin (GA) stimulates critical stages in plant growth and development by triggering the destruction of negative regulatory DELLA proteins. GA stimulates seed germination, stem elongation, transition to flowering, and flower development in most plant species. Genes of the DELLA family act as repressors of these GA responses. It appears that GA stimulates GA responses by causing DELLA protein destruction via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in diverse species including rice, barley, and Arabidopsis. This essay will use Arabidopsis as an example to discuss the current model for GA signaling via DELLA protein destruction, and will discuss the general notion of controlling plant growth and development by protein destruction.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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