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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Instrumentation and Control for Wireless Sensor Network for Automated Irrigation

Authors
item Kim, Yunseop
item Evans, Robert
item Iversen, William
item Pierce, Francis - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Proceedings of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers International (ASABE)
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 12, 2006
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: A wireless in-field sensor-based irrigation management system is of benefit to producers in efficient water management, but integrating hardware and software for sensing and control is challenging. An automated in-field soil sensing system was developed for real-time wireless monitoring. Wireless communication and power management was designed and constructed. In-field sensory data was periodically sampled and remotely transmitted to a computer. Each sensor station measured soil moisture, soil temperature, and air temperature, while one weather station recorded precipitation, wind speed and direction, air temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation. Sensors and a data logger were self-powered by a solar panel. A host computer received and real-time displayed field data without interference.

Technical Abstract: An in-field sensor-based irrigation system is of benefit to producers in efficient water management. A distributed wireless sensor network eliminates difficulties to wire sensor stations across the field and reduces maintenance cost. Implementing wireless sensor-based irrigation system is challenging on seamless integration of sensing, control, and data communication. An automated sensor-based irrigation system was developed for an integrated wireless in-field sensor network and automated variable rate irrigation. Field conditions were real-time monitored site-specifically by in-field sensor stations distributed across the field. Each sensor station measured soil moisture, soil temperature, and air temperature, while one weather station recorded precipitation, wind speed and direction, air temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation. Sensors and a data logger were self-powered by a solar panel and sensory data was periodically sampled and wirelessly transmitted to a base station about 700 m away from the sensor stations. A host computer received and real-time displayed field data without interference. This paper describes details of the design and construction of wireless communication, hardware used, and the costs and benefits of the control system.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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