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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EPIDEMIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND MOLECULAR GENETICS OF ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN PATHOGENIC AND COMMENSAL BACTERIA FROM FOOD ANIMALS

Location: Bacterial Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Resistance

Title: Antimicrobial Resistance of Arcobacter and Campylobacter from Broiler Carcasses

Authors
item Son, Insook - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Englen, Mark
item Berrang, Mark
item Cray, Paula
item Harrison, Mark - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA

Submitted to: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 30, 2006
Publication Date: April 1, 2007
Citation: Son, I., Englen, M.D., Berrang, M.E., Cray, P.J., Harrison, M.A. 2007. Antimicrobial resistance of arcobacter and campylobacter from broiler carcasses. International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents. 29(4):451-455.

Interpretive Summary: Campylobacter is a bacterium that has been shown to be the most common cause of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in humans, especially in industrialized countries. The source of most human infections is contaminated food products, especially poultry and poultry products. Arcobacter is closely related to Campylobacter but has not been established as a significant cause of human illness. However, this bacterium has recently gained attention as a potential emerging foodborne pathogen. Few reports have appeared on the antimicrobial resistance of Arcobacter from the poultry processing environment. The purpose of this study was to examine the antimicrobial resistance of Arcobacter (n = 174) and Campylobacter (n = 215) isolated from broiler carcasses in a commercial poultry processing plant. For Arcobacter, 93.7% (n = 163) were resistant to one or more antimicrobial, and 71.8% (n = 125) were resistant to two or more antimicrobials. For Campylobacter, 99.5% (n = 214) were resistant to one or more antimicrobial, and 28.4% (n = 61) were resistant to two or more antimicrobials. Of the A. butzleri isolates, 90% (n = 126) were resistant to clindamycin, 81.4% (n = 114) were resistance to azithromycin, and 23.6% (n = 33) were resistant to nalidixic acid. Resistance to tetracycline was very high in C. jejuni (99.5%) and C. coli (96.3%). Our results demonstrate substantial resistance in Arcobacter and Campylobacter to common antimicrobial agents. This work will be useful to researchers, regulatory agencies and producers, providing valuable new information on the antimicrobial resistance of a major pathogen and a closely related organsim from the commercial poultry processing environment.

Technical Abstract: The antimicrobial resistance of Arcobacter (n = 174) and Campylobacter (n = 215) isolated from broiler carcasses in a U.S. poultry processing plant was examined. For Arcobacter, 93.7% (n = 163) were resistant to one or more antimicrobial; 71.8% (n = 125) were resistant to two or more antimicrobials. For Campylobacter, 99.5% (n = 214) were resistant to one or more antimicrobial; 28.4% (n = 61) were resistant to two or more antimicrobials. Arcobacter butzleri isolates were particularly resistant to clindamycin (90%, n = 126), azithromycin (81.4%, n = 114), and nalidixic acid (23.6%, n = 33). Resistance to tetracycline was very high in C. jejuni (99.5%) and C. coli (96.3%). Our results demonstrate substantial resistance in Arcobacter and Campylobacter to common antimicrobial agents.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014