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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Chicken Thigh, Chicken Liver and Iron-Fortified Wheat Flour Optimize Iron Uptake in An Invitro Digestion/caco-2 Cell Model

Authors
item Pachon, Helena - CORNELL UNIVERSITY
item Stoltzfus, Rebecca - CORNELL UNIVERSITY
item Glahn, Raymond

Submitted to: Nutrition Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 11, 2008
Publication Date: December 3, 2008
Citation: Pachon, H., Stoltzfus, R., Glahn, R.P. 2008. CHICKEN THIGH, CHICKEN LIVER AND IRON-FORTIFIED WHEAT FLOUR OPTIMIZE IRON UPTAKE IN AN INVITRO DIGESTION/CACO-2 CELL MODEL. Nutrition Research. 28(12):851-858.

Interpretive Summary: The objective of this study was to screen multiple meat and fortified-food combinations to identify those that optimize iron uptake in a simulated digestion/cell culture model. Four experiments were conducted to test combinations of meats such as chicken (blood, spleen, liver, thigh), beef (cube steak), and fish (fish meal) with fortified foods (electrolytic iron-fortified infant rice cereal, reduced iron-fortified Guatemalan maize-soy flour, FeSO4-fortified Peruvian wheat flour). From the first experiment, equal amounts of chicken liver, thigh, spleen, blood, or fish meal increased iron uptake from the meat combined with the infant rice cereal. In the second experiment, chicken liver, thigh, blood, and beef increased the iron uptake from the meat combined with ferrous sulfate-fortified wheat flour. Chicken liver and thigh were selected for further tests. The bioavailability of these meats alone was greater or equal to the bioavailability of the meats when fortified foods were added to them. Adding either of these meats to the three fortified foods tested increased the bioavailability of the fortified foods alone. Chicken liver, chicken thigh, and wheat flour were selected as the principal ingredients for an infant porridge because the combinations with the highest bioavailability were chicken thigh + wheat flour, chicken liver + wheat flour, and chicken liver + maize-soy flour, and wheat flour was the least expensive fortified food sold in the target population.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this study was to screen multiple meat and fortified-food combinations to identify those that optimize iron uptake in an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model, a proxy for iron bioavailability. Four experiments were conducted to test combinations of meats such as chicken (blood, spleen, liver, thigh), beef (cube steak), and fish (fish meal) with fortified foods (electrolytic iron-fortified infant rice cereal, reduced iron-fortified Guatemalan maize-soy flour, FeSO4-fortified Peruvian wheat flour). From the first experiment, equal amounts of chicken liver, thigh, spleen, blood, or fish meal increased the Caco-2 cell ferritin formation in the meat combined with the infant rice cereal (P<0.05). In the second experiment, chicken liver, thigh, blood, and beef increased the Caco-2 cell ferritin formation in the meat combined with ferrous sulfate-fortified wheat flour (P<0.05). Chicken liver and thigh were selected for further tests. The bioavailability of these meats alone was greater (P<0.05) or equal (P>0.05) to the bioavailability of the meats when fortified foods were added to them. Adding either of these meats to the three fortified foods tested increased the bioavailability of the fortified foods alone (P<0.05). Chicken liver, chicken thigh, and wheat flour were selected as the principal ingredients for an infant porridge because the combinations with the highest bioavailability were chicken thigh + wheat flour, chicken liver + wheat flour, and chicken liver + maize-soy flour, and wheat flour was the least expensive fortified food sold in the target population.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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