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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Past, Present, and Future of Fruit Germplasm Exploration

Author
item Hummer, Kim

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 15, 2006
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The fruits of the earth have healed, nurtured, and intrigued humanity throughout history. Genome complexities of cultivated fruit species combined with people’s increased nutritional needs insure that the future will be no different. Prospecting for wild fruit species will continue. The global nature of science and commerce will dictate the need to expand available genetic resources for fruit improvement. New technologies will enable future explorers to reach remote sites and species. Recent advances, such as geo-positioning and remote communication devices, will be used to a greater degree for targeting specific collection sites and documenting records of origin. The ownership of countries over their dominion of plant genetic resources, as initiated by the Convention on Biological Diversity and the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, will continue to be a cornerstone for negotiations in bilateral agreements and plant exchange. While this could be considered a limitation to plant exploration in some situations, global strategies now in conceptual infancy will be developed to encourage and support gene bank preservation and continued plant exchange for long-term conservation and humanitarian benefit.

Technical Abstract: The fruits of the earth have healed, nurtured, and intrigued humanity throughout history. Genome complexities of cultivated fruit species combined with people’s increased nutritional needs insure that the future will be no different. Prospecting for wild fruit species will continue. The global nature of science and commerce will dictate the need to expand available genetic resources for fruit improvement. New technologies will enable future explorers to reach remote sites and species. Recent advances, such as geo-positioning and remote communication devices, will be used to a greater degree for targeting specific collection sites and documenting records of origin. The sovereignty of countries over their dominion of plant genetic resources, as initiated by the Convention on Biological Diversity and the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, will continue to be a cornerstone for negotiations in bilateral agreements and plant exchange. While this could be considered a limitation to plant exploration in some situations, global strategies now in conceptual infancy will be developed to encourage and support ex situ preservation and continued plant exchange for long-term conservation and humanitarian benefit.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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