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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Pearl Millet As a Rotation Crop for Peanut

Authors
item Timper, Patricia
item Brenneman, T - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Hanna, W - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Wilson, Jeffrey

Submitted to: Plant Health Progress
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 20, 2006
Publication Date: February 2, 2007
Repository URL: http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/php/
Citation: Timper, P., Brenneman, T.B., Hanna, W.W., Wilson, J.P. 2007. Pearl millet as a rotation crop for peanut. Plant Health Progress, doi:1094/PHP-2007-0202-02-RS. Available:http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/php/.

Interpretive Summary: In the southeastern United States, there are limited options for crops that can be grown in rotation with peanut. Pearl millet has potential as a grain crop, and some hybrids have been shown to be resistant to the peanut root-knot nematode, the primary nematode pest of peanut in this region. The objective of this study was to determine whether pearl millet reduces the peanut root-knot nematode when planted in rotation with peanut, and does not lead to an increase in soil-borne diseases. The rotations were peanut following either 2 years of corn, HGM-100 pearl millet, or TifGrain 102 pearl millet. There were two staggered sequences of each rotation so that a cycle was completed in 2004 and in 2005. In both years, root galling from the nematode was lower on peanut following TifGrain 102 (4.6 on a 0 to 10 scale) and corn (4.9) than following HGM-100 (7.5). Peanut yields in 2004 were low and unaffected by the preceding rotation crop; however, in 2005, yields were greater in peanut following 2 years of TifGrain 102 (2320 kg/ha) and corn (2504 kg/ha) than following HGM-100 (1821 kg/ha). The lower yields following HGM-100 were likely due to larger densities of the peanut root-knot nematode that had developed on the susceptible pearl millet hybrid. We conclude that the pearl millet hybrid TifGrain 102 is as effective as corn in limiting population increase of the peanut root-knot nematode and in enhancing peanut yield compared to another pearl millet hybrid, HGM-100. Moreover, pearl millet does not appear to increase either stem rot or Rhizoctonia limb rot in peanut.

Technical Abstract: In the southeastern United States, there are limited options for crops that can be grown in rotation with peanut (Arachis hypogaea). Pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) has potential as a grain crop, and some hybrids have been shown to be resistant to the peanut root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne arenaria), the primary nematode pest of peanut in this region. The objective of this study was to determine whether pearl millet reduces M. arenaria when planted in rotation with peanut, and does not lead to an increase in soil-borne diseases. The experiment was arranged as a randomized, complete-block design with six replications. The rotations were peanut following either 2 years of corn, HGM-100 pearl millet, or TifGrain 102 pearl millet. There were two staggered sequences of each rotation so that a cycle was completed in 2004 and in 2005. In both years, root galling from M. arenaria was lower on peanut following TifGrain 102 (4.6 on a 0 to 10 scale) and corn (4.9) than following HGM-100 (7.5). Peanut yields in 2004 were low and unaffected by the preceding rotation crop; however, in 2005, yields were greater in peanut following 2 years of TifGrain 102 (2320 kg/ha) and corn (2504 kg/ha) than following HGM-100 (1821 kg/ha). The lower yields following HGM-100 were likely due to larger densities of M. arenaria that had developed on the susceptible pearl millet hybrid. We conclude that the pearl millet hybrid TifGrain 102 is as effective as corn in limiting population increase of M. arenaria and in enhancing peanut yield compared to another pearl millet hybrid, HGM-100. Moreover, pearl millet does not appear to increase either stem rot or Rhizoctonia limb rot in peanut.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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