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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONTROL OF ARTHROPOD PESTS OF PECAN AND PEACH Title: Entomopathogenic Nematodes and Insects: Direct and Active Infection

Authors
item Shapiro Ilan, David
item Campbell, James
item Lewis, E - UNIV OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS

Submitted to: Journal of Nematology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 9, 2006
Publication Date: June 15, 2006
Citation: Shapiro Ilan, D.I., Campbell, J.F., Lewis, E.E. 2006. Entomopathogenic nematodes and insects: direct and active infection [abstract]. Journal of Nematology. 38:292.

Interpretive Summary: In nature, entomopathogenic (insect-killing) nematodes must infect an insect host in order to complete their life cycle. The decision to infect or not is critical because once inside the host there is no turning back. Differential foraging strategies, ranging from a sit and wait ambusher approach to an active host-seeking or cruiser approach, clearly affect transmission and infectivity. Yet, further studies are required to elucidate aspects of host attraction and infection dynamics that vary among and within ambusher and cruiser species. Certain chemical or physical cues appear to attract or repel entomopathogenic nematodes to their host. However, the relative importance and interaction among these cues remain unclear. We believe that the next steps in understanding entomopathogenic nematode infection dynamics will include characterization of specific cues, assessing the nutritive status of host, and defining interactions between population dynamics and infectivity.

Technical Abstract: In nature, entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae) must infect an insect host in order to complete their life cycle. The decision to infect or not is critical because once inside the host there is no turning back. Here, we review and analyze infection behavior of entomopathogenic nematodes. Differential foraging strategies, ranging from a sit and wait ambusher approach to an active host-seeking or cruiser approach, clearly affect transmission and infectivity. Yet, further studies are required to elucidate aspects of host attraction and infection dynamics that vary among and within ambusher and cruiser species. Certain chemical or physical cues appear to attract or repel entomopathogenic nematodes to their host. However, the relative importance and interaction among these cues remain unclear. We believe that the next steps in understanding entomopathogenic nematode infection dynamics will include characterization of specific cues, assessing the nutritive status of host, and defining interactions between population dynamics and infectivity.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014