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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Crop Sequence Effects on Leaf Spot Diseases of No-Till Wheat

Authors
item Krupinsky, Joseph
item Merrill, Stephen
item Tanaka, Donald
item Liebig, Mark
item Lares, Michael
item Hanson, Jonathan

Submitted to: Agronomy Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 12, 2007
Publication Date: June 5, 2007
Citation: Krupinsky, J.M., Merrill, S.D., Tanaka, D.L., Liebig, M.A., Lares, M.T., Hanson, J.D. 2007. Crop sequence effects on leaf spot diseases of no-till wheat. Agron. J. 99(4):912-920.

Interpretive Summary: With a reduction in the traditional fallow-wheat cropping system and the adoption of reduced-tillage, producers are including more diverse crops in their cropping systems. Crop diversification and crop sequencing can influence leaf spot diseases on spring wheat. Field research was conducted near Mandan, ND to determine the impact of crop sequences on leaf spot diseases of wheat early in the growing season. Spring wheat was seeded in the crop residue of ten crops (buckwheat, canola, chickpea, corn, dry pea, grain sorghum, lentil, oil seed sunflower, proso millet, and hard red spring wheat) and evaluated for leaf spot disease severity. Tan spot was the most common leaf spot disease followed by Stagonopora blotch. Both leaf spot diseases were present throughout the growing season and impacted by crop sequencing. Spring wheat following crop sequences with other crops for one or two years had lower levels of disease severity compared to a continuous wheat treatment early in the growing season. These early evaluations of disease severity demonstrate and confirm the benefit of alternative crops preceding wheat. Crop sequence is an important management practice, which should be combined with other management practices, to lower the risk for leaf spot diseases of spring wheat.

Technical Abstract: With a reduction in the traditional fallow-wheat system and adoption of reduced-till or no-till annual cropping systems, producers are including alternative crops such as oilseeds, pulses, and forages. Understanding how these crops and management practices interact is essential in the development of practical, efficient, and cost-effective cropping systems capable of stabilizing crop production while minimizing deleterious effects on the environment. Crop diversification and crop sequencing/crop rotation can influence leaf spot diseases on hard red spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Field research was conducted near Mandan, ND to determine the impact of crop sequences on leaf spot diseases of wheat early in the growing season. Spring wheat was direct seeded (no-till) in the crop residue of ten crops (buckwheat [Fagopyrum esculentum Moench], canola [Brassica napus L.], chickpea [Cicer arietinum L.], corn [Zea mays L.], dry pea [Pisum sativum L.], grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor {L.} Moench], lentil [Lens culinaris Medik.], oil seed sunflower [Helianthus annuus L.], proso millet [Panicum miliaceum L.], and hard red spring wheat) in 2004 and 2005 and evaluated for leaf spot disease severity. Pyrenophora tritici-repentis [Died.] Drechs., the cause of tan spot, was the most common fungus followed by Phaeosphaeria nodorum [E. Müller] Hedjaroude, the cause of stagonopora nodorum blotch. Pyrenophora tritici-repentis and P. nodorum were present throughout the growing season and the percentages of isolation following alternative crops tended to be lower compared to wheat following wheat. Leaf spot diseases on hard red spring wheat were impacted by crop sequencing. Spring wheat following crop sequences with alternative crops for one or two years had lower levels of disease severity compared to a continuous wheat treatment early in the growing season. These early evaluations of disease severity demonstrate and confirm the benefit of alternative crops preceding wheat. Crop sequence is an important management practice, which should be combined with other management practices, to lower the risk for leaf spot diseases of spring wheat.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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