Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF IMAGING TECHNOLOGY FOR FOOD SAFETY AND SECURITY

Location: Quality and Safety Assessment Research Unit

Title: Effect of Internal Versus External Fecal Contamination on Broiler Carcass Microbiology

Authors
item Smith, Douglas
item Northcutt, Julie
item Cason Jr, John
item Hinton, Jr, Arthur
item Buhr, Richard
item Ingram, Kimberly

Submitted to: Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 16, 2006
Publication Date: July 17, 2006
Citation: Smith, D.P., Northcutt, J.K., Cason Jr, J.A., Hinton Jr, A., Buhr, R.J. 2006. Effect of internal versus external fecal contamination on broiler carcass microbiology [abstract]. Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract. 85(Suppl.1):133.

Technical Abstract: A study was conducted to determine the effect of visible external or internal fecal contamination on the microbiology of broiler carcasses. In each of three trials, 12 uneviscerated carcasses were obtained from a commercial processing plant, placed on a shackle line and eviscerated on commercial equipment in a pilot plant. One g of cecal contents was placed on either the exterior breast area to mimic outside contamination (OC), inside the carcass (IC), or not applied (Control). All carcasses were held 10 min prior to washing. Carcasses were replaced on the shackle line and passed through a commercial inside-outside bird washe (IOBW) set at 80 PSI (552 kPa), 5 s dwell time, using approximately 47 gal (178 L) per min of tap water at ambient temperature. Whole carcass rinses (WCR) were conducted and coliforms, E. coli, and Campylobacter counts were determined and are reported as log cfu/ml rinse. Coliform counts for OC (5.0) were significantly (P<0.05) greater than IC (4.5), which were significantly greater than Control (3.7). E. coli counts from OC (4.9) were significantly greater than IC (4.2), which were greater than Control (3.6). Campylobacter counts for OC (3.6) were significantly greater than IC (2.6), which were greater than Control (2.2). Visible contamination was observed on post-wash OC carcasses, but not in or on post-wash IC carcasses. In this study, post-wash carcasses with external contamination had fewer bacteria than carcasses with external contamination. However, washing did not reduce bacteria from internally contaminated carcasses to control levels. Key words; fecal contamination, inside-outside bird washer, coliform, E. coli, Campylobacter

Last Modified: 9/22/2014