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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Strategic Grazing: Monitoring the Changes

Authors
item Taylor, Joshua
item Moffet, Corey
item Booth, D

Submitted to: Internet Web Page
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 27, 2006
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Monitoring is critical when manipulating ecosystems toward a desired goal. Unfortunately, cost and(or) logistics may limit a rangeland manager’s choice of monitoring tools. Ultimately, such tools must be affordable and provide rapid, accurate, and precise information that can be used to determine the status and effectiveness of a management strategy(s) that is in progress. USDA-Agricultural Research Service scientists at the High Plains Grasslands Research Station (Cheyenne, WY) and the U. S. Sheep Experiment Station (Dubois, ID) are currently investigating various rangeland monitoring technologies. The use of high-resolution digital imagery, obtained on the ground or from a fixed-winged aircraft, combined with various vegetation-measurement software packages are tools being tested for determining 1) vegetation response to fire, grazing, and herbicide treatments, 2) herbivore selectivity, and 3) distribution of exotic weeds across extensive landscapes. These technologies are quickly applied and generate data that can 1) represent large and small landscapes, 2) be analyzed immediately or during the off-season, and 3) be stored for an indefinite period of time without loss of quality.

Technical Abstract: Monitoring is critical when manipulating ecosystems toward a desired goal. Unfortunately, cost and(or) logistics may limit a rangeland manager’s choice of monitoring tools. Ultimately, such tools must be affordable and provide rapid, accurate, and precise information that can be used to determine the status and effectiveness of a management strategy(s) that is in progress. USDA-Agricultural Research Service scientists at the High Plains Grasslands Research Station (Cheyenne, WY) and the U. S. Sheep Experiment Station (Dubois, ID) are currently investigating various rangeland monitoring technologies. The use of high-resolution digital imagery, obtained on the ground or from a fixed-winged aircraft, combined with various vegetation-measurement software packages are tools being tested for determining 1) vegetation response to fire, grazing, and herbicide treatments, 2) herbivore selectivity, and 3) distribution of exotic weeds across extensive landscapes. These technologies are quickly applied and generate data that can 1) represent large and small landscapes, 2) be analyzed immediately or during the off-season, and 3) be stored for an indefinite period of time without loss of quality.

Last Modified: 7/31/2014