Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SOIL APPLICATION OF AGRICULTURAL WASTE TO IMPROVE CROP PRODUCTION SYSTEMS AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

Location: National Soil Dynamics Laboratory

Title: A New Substrate for Container-Grown Plants: Clean Chip Residual

Authors
item Boyer, Cheryl - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Fain, Glenn - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Gilliam, Charles - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Torbert, Henry
item Gallagher, Thomas - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Sibley, Jeff - AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: October 8, 2006
Publication Date: October 8, 2006
Citation: Boyer, C.R., Fain, G.B., Gilliam, C.H., Torbert Iii, H.A., Gallagher, T.V., Sibley, J.L. 2006. A new substrate for container-grown plants: clean chip residual. In: Proceedings of the International Plant Propagators Society 2006 Annual Meetings, October 8-11, 2006, Charlotte, North Carolina. 56:553-559.

Interpretive Summary: In recent years, nursery plants in the Southeast US have typically been grown in pine bark substrates, but pine bark is becoming increasingly difficult to obtain. Clean Chip Residual (CCR) is a potential new nursery substrate that is a forestry waste by-product composed of approximately 50% wood, 40% bark and 10% needles. A study evaluated CCR as a growth substrate for container-grown nursery production of Two perennial species, Buddleia and Verbena. Growth of these species in CCR were, in general, similar to plants grown in typical pine bark substrates. These results indicate that CCR has the potential to be a viable substrate option for the nursery industry.

Technical Abstract: Clean Chip Residual (CCR) is a potential new nursery substrate that is a forestry by-product composed of approximately 50% wood, 40% bark and 10% needles. This study evaluated CCR as a growth substrate for container-grown nursery crops. Two perennial species were grown in one of eight substrates (100% bark from two sources, two screen sizes of CCR and the same treatments combined with 20% peat) along with standard nursery amendments. Species tested included Buddleia davidii ‘Pink Delight’ and Verbena canadensis ‘Homestead Purple’. Growth of these species in CCR were, in general, similar to plants grown in typical pine bark substrates. These results indicate that CCR has the potential to be a viable substrate option for the nursery industry.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014