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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Proposed Strategy for Selection Against Recessive Genetic Defects Through a Combination of Inbreeding and DNA Markers

Authors
item Thallman, Richard
item Keele, John
item Bennett, Gary

Submitted to: World Congress of Genetics Applied in Livestock Production
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: February 25, 2006
Publication Date: August 13, 2006
Citation: Thallman, R.M., Keele, J.W., Bennett, G.L. 2006. Proposed strategy for selection against recessive genetic defects through a combination of inbreeding and DNA markers. Proceedings of the 8th World Congress of Genetics Applied in Livestock Production. CD-Rom Communication No. 03-08. Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Interpretive Summary: A strategy of mating influential sires to their daughters is proposed to select against recessive defects. Sixteen to 24 inbred progeny should produce two to three progeny homozygous for any recessive defect carried by their sire. Recent developments in DNA markers should often make it possible to map recessive defects to a reasonably small proportion of the genome (in many cases only one chromosomal region) from only 16 to 24 progeny of sire-daughter matings. Following a defect with DNA markers allows selection pressure to be shifted from the highly influential sire of the affected progeny to his descendants and collateral relatives before they produce progeny, greatly improving the efficiency of selection. Routine use of this approach might improve the consistency and performance of commercial livestock.

Technical Abstract: A strategy of mating influential sires to their daughters is proposed to select against recessive defects. Sixteen to 24 inbred progeny should produce two to three progeny homozygous for any recessive defect carried by their sire. Recent developments in DNA markers should often make it possible to map recessive defects to a reasonably small proportion of the genome (in many cases only one chromosomal region) from only 16 to 24 progeny of sire-daughter matings. Following a defect with DNA markers allows selection pressure to be shifted from the highly influential sire of the affected progeny to his descendants and collateral relatives before they produce progeny, greatly improving the efficiency of selection. Routine use of this approach might improve the consistency and performance of commercial livestock.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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