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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The North American Monsoon Experiment (Name) 2004 Field Campaign and Modeling Strategy

Authors
item Higgins, W - NOAA
item Ahijevych, D - NCAR
item Amador, J - UNIV. OF COSTA RICA
item Barros, A - DUKE UNIVERSITY
item Berbery, H - UNIV. OF MD
item Caetano, E - UNIVERSIDAD NAT AU MEXICO
item Carbone, R - NCAR
item Ciesielski, P - COLORADO STATE UNIV
item Cifelli, R - COLORADO STATE UNIV
item Cortez-Vazquez, M - SERVICO METEORO NACIONAL
item Douglas, A - CREIGHTON UNIVERSITY
item Douglas, M - NOAA
item Emmanuel, G - UCAR
item Fairall, C - NOAA
item Gochis, D - NCAR
item Gutzler, D - UNIV OF NM
item Jackson, Thomas
item Johnson, R - COLORADO STATE UNIV
item Lang, T - COLORADO STATE UNIV
item Lee, M - NASA
item Lettenmaier, D - UNIV OF WASHINGTON
item Lobato, R - INST MEXICANO DE TECHNOL
item Magana, V - UNIV NACINAL AUTO MEXICO

Submitted to: Bulletin of the American Meterological Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 10, 2006
Publication Date: June 1, 2006
Citation: Higgins, W., Ahijevych, D., Amador, J., Barros, A., Berbery, H., Caetano, E., Carbone, R., Ciesielski, P., Cifelli, R., Cortez-Vazquez, M., Douglas, A., Douglas, M., Emmanuel, G., Fairall, C., Gochis, D., Gutzler, D., Jackson, T.J., Johnson, R., Lang, T., Lee, M., Lettenmaier, D., Lobato, R., Magana, V. 2006. The North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) 2004 field campaign and modeling strategy. Bulletin of the American Meterological Society. 87:79-94.

Interpretive Summary: An international team of scientists from the United States, Mexico and Central America carried out a major field campaign during the summer of 2004 to develop improved North American monsoon precipitation forecasts. The North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) is an internationally coordinated process study aimed at determining the sources and limits of predictability of warm season precipitation over North America. NAME seeks improved understanding of the key physical processes that must be parameterized for more realistic simulations and accurate predictions with coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Land (OAL) models. A fundamental first step towards improved prediction is the clear documentation of the major elements of the monsoon system and their variability. By the end of the program, NAME will have delivered an improved observing system design for monitoring and predicting the North American monsoon, more comprehensive understanding of North American summer climate variability and predictability, strengthened scientific collaboration across Pan-America, and measurably improved climate models that simulate and predict monsoon variability months to seasons in advance.

Technical Abstract: The North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) is an internationally coordinated process study aimed at determining the sources and limits of predictability of warm season precipitation over North America. NAME seeks improved understanding of the key physical processes that must be parameterized for more realistic simulations and accurate predictions with coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Land (OAL) models. A fundamental first step towards improved prediction is the clear documentation of the major elements of the monsoon system and their variability within the context of the evolving O-A-L annual cycle. NAME employs a multi-scale (tiered) approach with focused monitoring, diagnostic and modeling activities in the core monsoon region, on the regional-scale and on the continental-scale. NAME 2004 was an unprecedented opportunity to gather an extensive set of atmospheric, oceanic and land-surface observations in the core region of the North American monsoon, which is northwestern Mexico, the southwestern United States, and adjacent oceanic areas. During the campaign data were gathered from more than 20 different types of instrument platforms, including surface meteorological stations, radars, aircraft, research vessels, satellites, windprofilers, rawinsondes and raingauge networks. The campaign involved scientists from more than 30 universities, government laboratories and federal agencies, including more than 30 weather forecasters. NAME 2004 produced immediate benefits, including enhanced (and sustained) observations for monitoring the monsoon, and a two-way exchange of information, technology and training between NOAA/National Weather Service and the Mexican National Weather Service (Servicio Meteorólógico Nacional or SMN). NAME empirical and modeling studies are leveraging the NAME 2004 data to accelerate improvements in warm season precipitation forecasts, products and applications over North America.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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