Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: 'anananasnaya' Hardy Kiwifruit

Authors
item Strik, Bernadine - OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
item Hummer, Kim

Submitted to: Journal of American Pomological Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 17, 2006
Publication Date: July 20, 2006
Citation: Strik, B., Hummer, K.E. 2006. 'anananasnaya' hardy kiwifruit. Journal of American Pomological Society. 60(3):106-112.

Interpretive Summary: ‘Ananasnaya’ is a red ripening, cold hardy kiwifruit with excellent tart flavor and high vitamin C content. This cultivar was bred by I. V. Michuran,a Russian plant breeder, about 1935. The plant can survive mid-winter temperatures as low as -30 o F), though young shoots or blooming flowers can be injured by late winter or early spring frosts. The fruits are medium-sized, egg-shaped, and about the size of a grape. More than 100 acres of ‘Ananasnaya’ are now being commercially cultivated in Oregon. About 200 acres are in production in the United States. The plantings of this and other hardy kiwifruit cultivars is expanding as small fruit growers diversify their crops.

Technical Abstract: Actinidia arguta (Siebold & Zucc.) Planch. ex Miq hybrid ‘Ananasnaya’ is a red ripening, cold hardy kiwifruit with excellent tart flavor and high vitamin C content. This cultivar was bred in the 1930's by I. V. Michuran, a Russian Breeder, and has a likely pedigree of A. arguta x A. kolomikta (Maxim. & Rupr.) Maxim. The plant can survive mid-winter temperatures as low as -35 o C (-30 o F), though young shoots or blooming flowers can be injured by late winter or early spring frosts. The fruits are medium-sized, ovoid, 3.5 cm long x 2.5 cm wide (1.5 x 1 in.), with persistent calyces. More than 42 ha (100 acres) of ‘Ananasnaya’ are now being commercially cultivated in Oregon. About twice that acreage is in production in the United States. Plantings of this and other hardy kiwifruit cultivars is expanding as small fruit growers diversify their crops.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014