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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Irrigation System Effects on Soil Carbon and Nitrogen under Sugarbeet and Barley in Northern Great Plains

Authors
item SAINJU, UPENDRA
item Evans, Robert
item IVERSEN, WILLIAM

Submitted to: Proceedings of Great Plains Soil Fertility Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 7, 2006
Publication Date: March 7, 2006
Citation: Sainju, U.M., Evans, R.G., Iversen, W.M. 2006. Irrigation system effects on soil carbon and nitrogen under sugarbeet and barley in northern great plains. Proceedings of Great Plains Soil Fertility Conference. Proceedings of the Great Plains Soil Fertility Conference, March 7-8, 2006, Denver, Colorado. p. 286-291.

Interpretive Summary: Irrigation system may influence the growth and yields of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) and malt barley (Hordeum vulgaris L.), amount of their residue returned to the soil, and soil C and N levels. The effect of two irrigation systems [low energy precision application (LEPA) and mid-elevation spray application (MESA)] was examined on the amount of biomass (stems + leaves) residue returned to the soil from conventional till sugarbeet (CTSB), strip till sugarbeet (STSB), and conventional till malt barley (CTMB), and soil organic C, total N, NH4-N and NO3-N levels at the 0 to 35 cm depth in eastern Montana in 2004. Irrigation system did not influence biomass yield, residue cover, and soil C and N levels. Biomass yield, C content, and residue cover were higher in CTMB than in CTSB and STSB. Soil organic C and total N were similar between cropping systems. The NH4-N content was higher in CTSB than in CTMB but NO3-N was higher in CTMB than in CTSB and STSB. Although irrigation system did not influence crop biomass yields and soil properties, increased N uptake probably reduced soil NO3-N in sugarbeet than in malt barley. Greater biomass residue returned to the soil and its higher C:N ratio likely increased residue cover in malt barley compared with sugarbeets.

Technical Abstract: Irrigation system may influence the growth and yields of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) and malt barley (Hordeum vulgaris L.), amount of their residue returned to the soil, and soil C and N levels. The effect of two irrigation systems [low energy precision application (LEPA) and mid-elevation spray application (MESA)] was examined on the amount of biomass (stems + leaves) residue returned to the soil from conventional till sugarbeet (CTSB), strip till sugarbeet (STSB), and conventional till malt barley (CTMB), and soil organic C, total N, NH4-N and NO3-N levels at the 0 to 35 cm depth in eastern Montana in 2004. Irrigation system did not influence biomass yield, residue cover, and soil C and N levels. Biomass yield, C content, and residue cover were higher in CTMB than in CTSB and STSB. Soil organic C and total N were similar between cropping systems. The NH4-N content was higher in CTSB than in CTMB but NO3-N was higher in CTMB than in CTSB and STSB. Although irrigation system did not influence crop biomass yields and soil properties, increased N uptake probably reduced soil NO3-N in sugarbeet than in malt barley. Greater biomass residue returned to the soil and its higher C:N ratio likely increased residue cover in malt barley compared with sugarbeets.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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