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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Nearctic Shrews, Sorex SPP., As Paratenic Hosts of Soboliphyme Baturini (Nematoda: Soboliphymidae).

Authors
item Karpenko, S - RUSSIA
item Dokuchaev, N - RUSSIA
item Hoberg, Eric

Submitted to: Comparative Parasitology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 14, 2006
Publication Date: January 1, 2007
Citation: Karpenko,S.V., Dokuchaev,N.E., Hoberg,E.P. 2007. Nearctic shrews, sorex spp., as paratenic hosts of soboliphyme baturini (Nematoda: Soboliphymidae). Comparative Parasitology. 74:81-87.

Interpretive Summary: : Soboliphyme baturini is an enigmatic nematode parasite found in mustelids (marten, wolverine, etc.) across the Holarctic. In eastern Russia transmission for this parasite involves mustelid definitive hosts, oligochaete intermediate hosts, and small mammals as putative paratenic hosts. Both shrews and arvicoline rodents have been demonstrated as paratenic hosts for this parasite from Siberia; such hosts had not been previsouly demonstrated in the cycle of this nematode in North America. Third-stage larvae of Soboliphyme baturini were discovered for the first time in shrews, Sorex cinereus, and S. tundrensis from Alaska and the Nearctic. Shrews were found to be infected with L3 at Suloia Lake, southeastern Alaska, Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, southwestern Alaska and from the Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve near the Yukon-Alaska border. Larvae from shrews in Alaska were morphologically indistinguishable from those known from both insectivores and arvicoline rodents in the Russian Far East. Occurrence of S. baturini in Alaskan insectivores further establishes shrews as important hosts in the transmission of S. baturini among mustelids and other carnivores and indicates for the first time the basis for a paratenic cycle in the Nearctic.

Technical Abstract: : Third-stage larvae of Soboliphyme baturini were discovered for the first time in shrews, Sorex cinereus, and S. tundrensis from Alaska and the Nearctic. Shrews were found to be infected with L3 at Suloia Lake, southeastern Alaska, Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, southwestern Alaska and from the Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve near the Yukon-Alaska border. Larvae from shrews in Alaska were morphologically indistinguishable from those known from both insectivores and arvicoline rodents in the Russian Far East. Occurrence of S. baturini in Alaskan insectivores further establishes shrews as important hosts in the transmission of S. baturini among mustelids and other carnivores and indicates for the first time the basis for a paratenic cycle in the Nearctic.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014