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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Novel High-Temperature Adult Plant (Htap) Stripe Rust Resistance Gene Yr36 from Triticum Turgidum Ssp. Dicoccoides Is Closely Linked to the Grain Protein Content Locus Gpc-B1

Authors
item Uauy, C - UNIV OF CA, DAVIS, CA
item Brevis, J - UNIV OF CA, DAVIS, CA
item Chen, Xianming
item Khan, I - UNIV OF CA, DAVIS, CA
item Jackson, L - UNIV OF CA, DAVIS, CA
item Chicaiza, O - UNIV OF CA, DAVIS, CA
item Dubcovsky, J - UNIV OF CA, DAVIS, CA
item Distelfeld, A - UNIV OF HAIFA, ISRAEL
item Fahima, T - UNIV OF HAIFA, ISRAEL

Submitted to: Journal of Theoretical and Applied Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 2, 2005
Publication Date: December 1, 2005
Citation: Uauy, C., Brevis, J.C., Chen, X., Khan, I.A., Jackson, L.F., Chicaiza, O., Dubcovsky, J., Distelfeld, A., Fahima, T. 2005. Novel high-temperature adult plant (htap) stripe rust resistance gene yr36 from triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides is closely linked to the grain protein content locus gpc-b1. Theor. Appl. Genet. 112:97-105.

Interpretive Summary: A group of new races of the stripe rust pathogen have been frequent throughout the wheat growing regions of the United States since 2000. These new races are virulent to most of the seedling resistance genes limiting the resistance sources that can be used to combat this pathogen. High temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance has proven to be more durable than seedling resistance due to its non-race-specific nature, but its use is limited by the lack of mapping information. We report here the identification of a new HTAP resistance gene. Lines carrying this gene were susceptible to almost all the stripe rust pathogen races tested at the seedling stage but showed adult-plant resistance to the prevalent races in California and other regions of the US when tested at high diurnal temperatures. Single-gene lines for this gene were developed by six backcross generations. Field tests in two locations showed increased levels of field resistance to stripe rust and increased yields in single-gene lines carrying the gene compared to those without the gene. The gene was mapped on the short arm of chromosome 6B. Molecular markers completely or closely linked to the gene were identified, which are also closely linked to a grain protein content locus. Marker-assisted selection strategies are presented to improve stripe rust resistance and simultaneously select for protein quality.

Technical Abstract: Several new races of the stripe rust pathogen have been frequently found throughout the wheat growing regions of the United States since 2000. These new races are virulent to most of the seedling resistance genes limiting the resistance sources that can be used to combat this pathogen. High temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance has proven to be more durable than seedling resistance due to its non-race-specific nature, but its use is limited by the lack of mapping information. We report here the identification of a new HTAP resistance gene from Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides (DIC) designated as Yr36. Lines carrying this gene were susceptible to almost all the stripe rust pathogen races tested at the seedling stage but showed adult-plant resistance to the prevalent races in California when tested at high diurnal temperatures. Isogenic lines for this gene were developed by six backcross generations. Field tests in two locations showed increased levels of field resistance to stripe rust and increased yields in isogenic lines carrying the Yr36 gene compared to those without the gene. Recombinant substitution lines of chromosome 6B from DIC in the isogenic background of durum cv. Langdon were used to map the Yr36 gene on the short arm of chromosome 6B completely linked to Xbarc101, and within a 2-cM interval defined by PCR-based markers Xucw71 and Xbarc136. Flanking locus Xucw71 is also closely linked to the grain protein content locus Gpc-B1 (0.3-cM). Marker-assisted selection strategies are presented to improve stripe rust resistance and simultaneously select for high or low Gpc-B1 alleles.

Last Modified: 4/25/2014
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