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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Irrigation System Automation

Author
item Buchleiter, Gerald

Submitted to: Agronomy Society of America, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America Meeting
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 29, 2005
Publication Date: May 15, 2007
Citation: Buchleiter, G.W. 2007. Irrigation system automation. Agronomy Society of America, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America Meeting.In: Lascano, R.J. and R.E. Sojka (eds). Irrigation of Agricultural Crops. Am. Soc. of Agronomy Monograph #30, 2nd Ed. Am. Soc. Agronomy, Madison, WI. 181-194

Interpretive Summary: Interpretive summary: Features, evaluation criteria, and levels of implementation for automated irrigation systems are described but specific criteria and methods for actual design are not included. A brief history of research and implementation of systems for automated canal deliveries and surface irrigation, illustrates the difficulties in improving water application efficiencies when the infiltration rate is greatly affected by individual soil and slope conditions. Current automation practices use sprinkler or drip systems to achieve significant water and labor savings.

Technical Abstract: Technical abstract: Research and implementation of automated surface irrigation and canal delivery systems are described briefly. Although surge irrigation and cablegation demonstrated significant water and labor savings, significant adoption has not occurred because the irrigation industry does not have reasonably priced product that integrates the particular soil, slope, and water flow conditions to achieve improved system performance. Adoption of automated sprinkler and drip systems is occurring because the uniformity and efficiency of irrigations are not affected by the natural variations in soil and slope. Specialized application systems which moderate the aerial environment surrounding high value crops, reduce production losses due to frost damage and heat stress.

Last Modified: 11/21/2014
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