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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Influence of Chicken Transportation Cage Washing System on Wastewater Characteristics and Bacteria Recovery from Cage Flooring

Authors
item Northcutt, Julie
item Berrang, Mark

Submitted to: Journal of Applied Poultry Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 2006
Publication Date: October 1, 2006
Citation: Northcutt, J.K., Berrang, M.E. 2006. Influence of chicken transportation cage washing system on wastewater characteristics and bacteria recovery from cage flooring. Journal of Applied Poultry Research. 15(3):457-463.

Interpretive Summary: Surface swabs of fiberglass flooring in chicken transport cages (5 high, 3 door) were collected before and after washing and again after sanitizer application to evaluate the microbiological effectiveness of a commercial cage washing system. Corresponding wastewater samples (CWW) from the cage washing system were also collected and evaluated chemically and microbiologically. Washing cages significantly reduced the levels of total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and E. coli recovered from flooring by 1.5, 1.3 and 1.6 log10 cfu/m2, respectively. Levels of total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and E. coli on flooring were further reduced by 0.7, 0.6 and 0.8 log10 cfu/m2 after sanitizer application. Prevalence of Salmonella (1/27 positive) and Campylobacter (7/27 positive) on unwashed flooring decreased when cages were washed and sanitized to 0/27 positive for Salmonella and 2/27 positive for Campylobacter. Counts of total aerobic bacteria, coliforms and E. coli in CWW ranged from 2.0 to 4.0 log10 cfu/mL, and the prevalence of Salmonella (1/9 positive) and Campylobacter (1/9 positive) in the CWW was low. The present study demonstrates that washing chicken transport cages reduces, but does not completely eliminate bacterial contamination on the flooring surface.

Technical Abstract: Surface swabs of fiberglass flooring in chicken transport cages (5 high, 3 door) were collected before and after washing and again after sanitizer application to evaluate the microbiological effectiveness of a commercial cage washing system.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014