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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evaluation of Resistance and Fungicide Applications for Management of White Mold on Dry Bean

Authors
item Grunwald, Niklaus
item Miklas, Phillip

Submitted to: Fungicide and Nematocide Tests
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 9, 2006
Publication Date: April 13, 2006
Citation: Grunwald, N.J., Miklas, P.N. 2006. Evaluation of resistance and fungicide applications for management of white mold on dry bean. Fungicide and Nematocide Tests. 61:FC040.

Interpretive Summary: Combinations of fungicide application and resistance were evaluated for control of white mold in dry bean. White mold is caused by the pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The experiment was conducted at the Paterson research farm, USDA Agricultural Research Service, WA, where natural inoculum of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is abundant. The experiment followed a split plot design with four replications with fungicide treatment in the main plot and cultivar treatment in the subplot. Plots were overhead pivot-sprinkler irrigated daily to induce disease development. Yields were estimated on different dates by hand-harvesting the middle two rows as cultivars matured. Data were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance. White mold developed slowly and continuously in all plots. Significant differences were observed for cultivar and fungicide treatments for both yield and disease severity. In general, disease severity declined with more fungicide applications. Cultivars AN-37, Winchester and Aztec were significantly more resistant to white mold. Aztec had the highest yield combined with highest resistance making it cultivar of choice for production under conditions where white mold is expected to be severe. Aztec yielded the same with and without fungicide applications.

Technical Abstract: Combinations of fungicide application and resistance were evaluated for control of white mold in dry bean. The experiment was conducted at the Paterson research farm, USDA Agricultural Research Service, WA, where natural inoculum of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is abundant. The experiment followed a split plot design with four replications with fungicide treatment in the main plot and cultivar treatment in the subplot. Plots were planted on June 13 at a rate of 260,000 seed/A in plots of four rows spaced 22 in. and 10 ft. length. Plots were overhead pivot-sprinkler irrigated daily resulting in a maximum of 0.3 inches per day during the period of maximal vegetative growth to induce disease development. Yields were estimated on different dates by hand-harvesting the middle two rows as cultivars matured. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance. White mold developed slowly and continuously in all plots. Significant effects of cultivar and fungicide treatment were observed for both yield and disease severity, but not for the interaction of cultivar by fungicide treatments. In general, disease severity declined with more fungicide applications. Cultivars AN-37, Winchester and Aztec were significantly more resistant to white mold. Aztec had the highest yield combined with highest resistance making it cultivar of choice for production under conditions where white mold is expected to be severe. Aztec yielded the same with and without fungicide applications.

Last Modified: 7/31/2014
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