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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: NEW TECHNOLOGIES TO PROCESS VALUE-ADDED, HEALTHY FOODS FROM FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Location: Healthy Processed Foods Research

Title: Physical Properties of Particleboard Manufactured from Saline Creeping Wild Rye Residue of Anaerobic Digestion

Authors
item Zheng, Yi - UC DAVIS, DAVIS, CA
item Pan, Zhongli
item Zhang, Ruihong - UC DAVIS, DAVIS, CA
item Jenkins, Bryan - UC DAVIS, DAVIS, CA
item El-Mashad, Hamed - UC DAVIS, DAVIS, CA

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 2005
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: This research was aimed at developing new and value-added applications for Creeping Wild Rye (CWR), Leymus triticoides, a saline crop. In this study, CWR was studied as a feedstock for anaerobic digestion to produce biogas. The digested residue material was used as raw material to manufacture particleboard bonded by urea formaldehyde and/or polymeric methane diphenyl diisocyanate. The research results provided essential information about the technical and economic feasibilities of using CWR for biogas and particleboard production.

Technical Abstract: Saline crops are produced by reusing subsurface water from irrigation in agricultural production. Creeping Wild Rye (CWR), Leymus triticoides, is one of saline crops produced with the high salt irrigation water. At present, a large portion of CWR is directly burnt in fields. There is a need to identify value-added uses of such saline biomass as construction material and for energy production. In this study, CWR was studied as a feedstock for anaerobic digestion to produce biogas. The digested residue material was used as raw material to manufacture particleboard bonded by urea formaldehyde and/or polymeric methane diphenyl diisocyanate. The effect of these two binding agents on the properties of the final products was appraised. The properties of particleboards made from digested CWR were compared with those from untreated CWR. This study analyzed the mechanical properties, including modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, tensile strength, and internal bond, and water resistance properties, including short term and long term water absorptions and thickness swelling of the finished particleboards. The research results provided essential information about the technical and economic feasibilities of using CWR for biogas and particleboard production.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014