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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Organic watermelon variety trial using low and high input production methods

Authors
item Davis, Angela
item Webber, Charles
item Perkins Veazie, Penelope
item Russo, Vincent
item Edelson, Jonathan - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Hortscience Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 4, 2006
Publication Date: February 28, 2006
Citation: Davis, A.R., Webber III, C.L., Perkins Veazie, P.M., Russo, V.M., Edelson, J.V. 2006. Organic watermelon variety trial using low and high input production methods. Proceedings of the 25th Annual Horticulture Industries Show. p. 97-100.

Interpretive Summary: Many consumers consider organically produced fruits and vegetables to be healthier and safer then conventionally grown fruit. Because of this, consumers are often willing to pay more for organically grown crops. However production of organic fruits and vegetables can be challenging, especially in climates where weed, insect and disease control is difficult. Knowing which varieties of fruits and vegetables perform best under organic growing conditions is imperative for a good harvest. Unfortunately, there is limited information on watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) varieties that do well under organic growing conditions. Because of this, production characteristics of six watermelon varieties from certified organic seed sources under high and low input organic cultural practices in Southeastern Oklahoma were compared to determine which varieties perform best under both methods. High input production methods almost doubled the number of fruit produced for all varieties, producing greater yields and higher average fruit weights compared to the low input production methods. Statistically different sizes and yields were found between the varieties planted.

Technical Abstract: Many consumers consider organically produced fruits and vegetables to be healthier and safer then conventionally grown fruit. Because of this, consumers are often willing to pay more for organically grown crops. However production of organic fruits and vegetables can be challenging, especially in climates where weed, insect and disease control is difficult. Knowing which varieties of fruits and vegetables perform best under organic growing conditions is imperative for a good harvest. Unfortunately, there is limited information on watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) varieties that do well under organic growing conditions. Because of this, production characteristics of six watermelon varieties from certified organic seed sources under high and low input organic cultural practices in Southeastern Oklahoma were compared to determine which varieties perform best under both methods. High input production methods almost doubled the number of fruit produced for all varieties, producing greater yields and higher average fruit weights compared to the low input production methods. Statistically different sizes and yields were found between the varieties planted.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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