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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Analysis of the Polymethoxylated Flavone Content of Orange Oil Residues

Author
item Manthey, John

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 10, 2006
Publication Date: April 6, 2006
Repository URL: http://www.ars.usda.gov/sp2UserFiles/Place/66210000/Reprint963.pdf
Citation: Manthey, J.A. 2006. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis of the polymethoxylated flavone content of orange oil residues. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 54:3215-3218.

Interpretive Summary: A potentially valuable set of compounds, termed the polymethoxylated flavones, are recovered from orange oil residues. Measurements of the contents of these compounds in orange oil residues is currently done by a method requiring many steps and elaborate instrumentation. A new, one-step analytical method has been developed that allows far easier and more rapid analysis of the polymethoxylated flavones in the orange oil residues.

Technical Abstract: Preliminary studies have shown that orange peel polymethoxylated flavones (PMFs) exhibit beneficial biological properties in animals. These properties have increased the demands for these compounds as candidate nutraceuticals and specialty food ingredients. Orange oil residues are a likely commercial source of the PMFs, and a rapid, solvent-free method for the analysis of the PMFs in orange oil residues has been developed based on Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The intensities of the FTIR vibrations of the phenyl ring '(C=C) stretch at 1515 cm-1 of the PMFs can be used, relative to the intensity of the carbonyl stretch at 1733 cm-1 of the non-PMF orange oil residue components, to measure PMF content. Excellent correlations for the ratios of the intensities of these vibrations and the total PMF content were observed irrespective of source, viscosity, and presence of particulate material. The detection limit by this method is approximately 0.1% PMF.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014