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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Chapter 9: Integrating Science and Policy for Water Management

Authors
item Richter, H. - THE NATURE CONSERVANCY
item Goodrich, David
item Browning-Aiken, A. - UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA
item Varady, R. - UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

Submitted to: University of Arizona Press
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: July 23, 2007
Publication Date: April 15, 2009
Citation: Richter, H., Goodrich, D.C., Browning-Aiken, A., Varady, R. 2009. CHAPTER 9: INTEGRATING SCIENCE AND POLICY FOR WATER MANAGEMENT. In: Ecology and Conservation of the San Pedro River. Ed. by J. C. Stromberg and B. J. Tellman. Tucson: University of Arizona Press. p. 388-408.

Interpretive Summary: Freshwater and the myriad ecosystems which originate from them are indispensable to human health and survival. Yet population growth, climatic variability, and land uses such as mining and agricultural practices along the U.S.-Mexico border challenge our ability to manage clean groundwater aquifers in this region that support populations, agriculture, industry and riparian ecosystems. The San Pedro Basin which originates in northern Sonora, Mexico and flow north into southeastern Arizona is a internationally known example of such a resource. As the Southwest grapples with ways to increase water supplies and ensure water quality for its burgeoning population, various institutional and political drivers of change, including government agencies at all levels and elected officials trying to serve their constituents interests, directly affect specific water management policies in the region. Within the Upper San Pedro Basin, a variety of internal local (municipal/county level) and external (state and federal level) drivers have affected water management policy differently throughout the basin. As a result, stakeholders in the three subwatersheds within the Upper San Pedro Basin have responded very differently to their individual groundwater management challenges over time. This chapter provides a description of the collaborative efforts of scientists, agency representatives, non-governmental organizations, elected officials, and other stakeholders to address water policy and management problems in the Upper San Pedro River Basin.

Technical Abstract: Freshwater and the ecosystems from which it originates are indispensable to human health and survival. Yet population growth, climatic variability, and land uses such as mining and agricultural practices along the U.S.-Mexico border challenge our ability to manage this indispensable resource adequately. Challenges to regional security result and compromise the value of land as a place for families to grow and economies to prosper. As the Southwest grapples with ways to increase water supplies and ensure water quality for its burgeoning population, various institutional and political drivers of change, including government agencies at all levels and elected officials trying to serve their constituents interests, directly affect specific water management policies in the region. Within the Upper San Pedro Basin, a variety of internal local (municipal/county level) and external (state and federal level) drivers have affected water management policy differently throughout the basin. As a result, stakeholders in the three subwatersheds within the Upper San Pedro Basin have responded very differently to their individual groundwater management challenges over time. This chapter provides a description of the collaborative efforts of scientists, agency representatives, non-governmental organizations, elected officials, and other stakeholders to address water policy and management problems in the Upper San Pedro River Basin.

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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