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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Stored raisin products pests

Author
item JOHNSON, JUDY

Submitted to: Grape Pest Management
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: February 18, 2010
Publication Date: November 15, 2013
Citation: Johnson, J.A. 2013. Stored raisin products pests. Grape Pest Management. Third Edition. University of California, Agriculture and Natural Sciences. 433-445.

Interpretive Summary: A large portion of the grapes grown in California are dried and sold as raisins. Numerous insect pests attack stored raisins, and must be correctly identified before management practices can be properly applied. Insect pests of raisins can be separated into two categories; those insects attracted to drying raisins and those attacking stored raisins. Most of the insects that feed on drying raisins do not continue to feed on them when drying is complete; however, they are often of primary concern to growers because infested product may be downgraded or rejected when received by the packing house. Dried fruit beetle and raisin moth are the major species that attack drying raisins. Pests that attack raisins in storage are of concern because they may infest product at any time during storage and their populations are capable of continual increase. Their control often involves expensive commodity treatments and, more importantly, they are the insects most likely to be discovered by consumers. The two most important storage pests are Indianmeal moth and saw-toothed grain beetle. There are many other miscellaneous pests occasionally found in raisins. Management practices of stored raisin insect pests include monitoring, sanitation, naturally occurring biological agents and fumigation.

Technical Abstract: A large proportion of California grapes are dried for raisins. Insect pests of raisins can be separated into two categories; those insects attracted to drying raisins and those attacking stored raisins. Most of the insects that feed on drying raisins do not continue to feed on them when drying is complete; however, they are often of primary concern to growers because infested product may be downgraded or rejected when received by the packing house. Dried fruit beetle and raisin moth are the major species that attack drying raisins. Pests that attack raisins in storage are of concern because they may infest product at any time during storage and their populations are capable of continual increase. Their control often involves expensive commodity treatments and, more importantly, they are the insects most likely to be discovered by consumers. The two most important storage pests are Indianmeal moth and saw-toothed grain beetle. There are many other miscellaneous pests occasionally found in raisins. The information presented in this chapter provides growers with the knowledge to accurately identify raisin pests and develop successful management practices.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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