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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Clover Yellow Vein Virus Identified in Ammi Majus in Florida

Authors
item Irey, Michael
item Adkins, Scott
item Baker, Carlye - FDACS, DPI

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 2, 2006
Publication Date: March 1, 2006
Citation: Irey, M.S., Adkins, S.T., Baker, C.A. 2006. Clover yellow vein virus identified in ammi majus in Florida. Plant Disease. 90:380. online: DOI: 10.1094/PD-90-0380B.

Interpretive Summary: Ammi majus L., a member of the Apiaceae and also known as large bullwort, false Queen Anne’s lace, or bishop’s-weed, is frequently used in the floral trade to add a lacey look to floral bouquets. In March 2005, virus-like symptoms were observed in two A. majus cut-flower production fields in Martin County, FL. Microscopic, serological, and nucleic-acid based testing suggested the presence of one or more potyviruses viruses in the symptomatic plants. Nucleic acid and deduced amino acid sequences of a nucleic acid fragment amplified from total RNA of a symptomatic plant were 96-97% and 93-99% identical, respectively, to Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) sequences in GenBank. Although several potyviruses have been reported from A. majus, to the best of our knowledge, this represents the first report of ClYVV infection. This report continues cooperative research efforts between ARS and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry.

Technical Abstract: Ammi majus L., a member of the Apiaceae and also known as large bullwort, false Queen Anne’s lace, or bishop’s-weed, is frequently used in the floral trade to add a lacey look to floral bouquets. A. majus is native to the Mediterranean but it is cultivated in major growing areas including Holland, Israel, the UK, and the US. In March 2005, virus-like symptoms including mosaic, generalized chlorosis, vein clearing, interveinal chlorosis, and leaf rugosity were observed in two A. majus cut-flower production fields in Martin County, FL. Inclusion body morphology suggested the presence of one or more potyviruses in the symptomatic plants. Potyvirus infection was confirmed using a commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kit (Agdia, Elkhart, IN) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with degenerate potyvirus primers (1). Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of a 1625 base pair region of the RT-PCR product amplified from total RNA of a symptomatic plant were 96-97% and 93-99% identical, respectively, to Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) sequences in GenBank. Although several potyviruses have been reported from A. majus (2), to the best of our knowledge, this represents the first report of ClYVV infection.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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