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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECOLOGICALLY-BASED PEST MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR WESTERN COTTON

Location: Pest Management and Biocontrol Research

Title: Potential of Mass Trapping for Long-Term Pest Management and Eradication of Invasive Species

Authors
item El-Sayed, A - LINCOLN, NEW ZEALAND
item Suckling, D - LINCOLN, NEW ZEALAND
item Wearing, H - TIMARU, NEW ZEALAND
item Byers, John

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 15, 2006
Publication Date: October 1, 2006
Citation: El-Sayed, A.M., Suckling, D.M., Wearing, H.C., Byers, J.A. 2006. Potential of mass trapping for long-term pest management and eradication of invasive species. Journal of Economic Entomology 99(5): 1550-1564.

Interpretive Summary: Semiochemical-based pest management programs comprise three major approaches including mass trapping, “lure and kill”, and mating disruption that are being used to provide environmentally friendly control methods of insect pests. We discuss similarities and differences between the three approaches of semiochemical-based pest management. In this article, we primarily review the potential of the mass trapping approach in long-term pest management and in the eradication of invasive species. We highlight several study cases where mass trapping has been used either in long-term pest management (e.g. codling moth, pink bollworm, bark beetles, and fruit flies) or in eradication of invasive species (e.g. gypsy moth and cotton boll weevil). We list the critical issues that affect the efficacy of mass trapping and compare these with previously published models developed to investigate mass trapping efficacy in pest control. The potential of mass trapping in pest management has not been fully realized so we encourage further research and development of this technology.

Technical Abstract: Semiochemical-based pest management programs comprise three major approaches including mass trapping, “lure and kill”, and mating disruption that are being used to provide environmentally friendly control methods of insect pests. We discuss similarities and differences between the three approaches of semiochemical-based pest management. In this article, we primarily review the potential of the mass trapping approach in long-term pest management and in the eradication of invasive species. We highlight several study cases where mass trapping has been used either in long-term pest management (e.g. codling moth, pink bollworm, bark beetles, and fruit flies) or in eradication of invasive species (e.g. gypsy moth and cotton boll weevil). We list the critical issues that affect the efficacy of mass trapping and compare these with previously published models developed to investigate mass trapping efficacy in pest control. The potential of mass trapping in pest management has not been fully realized so we encourage further research and development of this technology.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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