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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Effects of Acute Restraint Stress on Pig Lymphocyte Proliferation and Igm Production in Vitro and Cortisol Levels in Vivo

Authors
item Burdick, N - TEXAS A&M UNIV-KINGSVILLE
item Welsh, T - TEXAS A&M, COLLEGE STA
item Carroll, Jeffery
item Laurenz, J - TEXAS ASM UNIV-KINGSVILLE

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: November 4, 2005
Publication Date: November 5, 2005
Citation: Burdick, Nicole, Welsh, Jr., Thomas H., Carroll, J.A., Laurenz, Jamie C. 2005. The effects of acute restraint stress on pig lymphocyte proliferation and IgM production in vitro and cortisol levels in vivo. Abstract No. 2. Available: http://www.tamus.edu/pathways/documents/Symposium/abstracts/2005/agriculture.doc.

Technical Abstract: This study investigated the effect of acute restraint stress on immune function and plasma cortisol levels. Crossbred pigs were restrained and blood collected initially and at 3 and 6 min of restraint. Plasma was collected for cortisol analysis and lymphocytes were isolated and plated in media containing Concanavalin A (ConA; 0 to 10 ug/mL). Cultures were incubated for 96 hours and immunoglobulin M (IgM) production and the extent of proliferation determined. Duration of restraint increased cortisol levels at 6 minutes when compared to initial and 3 min. Cultures established from pigs restrained for 3 min proliferated more than initial and 6 min cultures. IgM production decreased with increased duration of restraint. Regression analysis revealed a negative correlation between in vivo cortisol levels and the sensitivity of isolated lymphocytes to ConA in vitro. Additional studies are warranted to further define the relationship between in vivo neuroendocrine events and in vitro assessment of immune function.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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