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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY BASED WEED MANAGEMENT: FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH ON DORMANCY AND THE GENETICS OF WEEDS Title: Estimating Genetic Diversity of Canada Thistle Within North Dakota

Authors
item Slotta, Tracey
item Rothhouse, Jennifer - NDSU
item HORVATH, DAVID
item FOLEY, MICHAEL

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 30, 2005
Publication Date: February 13, 2006
Citation: Slotta, T.A., Rothhouse, J., Horvath, D.P., Foley, M.E. 2006. Estimating genetic diversity of Canada thistle within North Dakota. [Abstract]. Weed Science Society of America Abstracts 46:30.

Interpretive Summary: Poster Number 104: Estimating Genetic Diversity of Canada Thistle within North Dakota Canadian Thistle, Cirsium arvense, is a noxious weed that occurs in a wide range of habitats and is difficult to control due to its extensive root system. It causes crop yield loss and invades natural grassland communities. Here, we have concentrated on estimating the level of genetic diversity between populations in Theodore Roosevelt National Park (western North Dakota) and throughout North Dakota. Significant variation within populations were recovered, implying that populations are maintained through the introduction of new seeds versus through the spread of roots.

Technical Abstract: Canadian Thistle, Cirsium arvense, is a noxious weed that occurs in a wide range of habitats and is difficult to control due to its extensive root system. It causes crop yield loss and invades natural grassland communities. Here, we have concentrated on estimating the level of genetic diversity between populations in Theodore Roosevelt National Park (western North Dakota) and throughout North Dakota. Eighteen populations were collected within the park boundaries, which consist of rolling native grasslands, prairie dog towns and few drainage areas. Two to 43 individuals were collected from each population. Four additional populations in the state include 50 samples from roadside, agricultural, and commercial areas with 10-15 individuals per population. Two genetic markers, ISSRs (inter-simple sequence repeats) and microsatellites designed for C. arvense in North America, were used to examine genetic variation. Molecular diversity and AMOVA analyses were conducted. Populations were analyzed independently and as groups based on distribution. There was highly significant variation detected within the populations (P > 0.01). Among the groups, there was more variation between individuals within a population than between the groups. When looking at variation within each population, it was discovered that these had very similar levels of genetic variation. While examining the percentage of polymorphic loci within each group, analysis suggests that ISSRs were more variable than microsatellites. The level of variation recovered is greater than expected for a clonally reproducing invasive plant.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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